Alaska and the Arctic

In Alaska you’ll find some of the largest and most sensitive tracts of wild land left on Earth. Yet these lands may not stay that way if the oil and gas and timber industries have their way.

The sheer wildness of Alaska is unmatched by any state, leaving most visitors to this land no less than awestruck.  Soaring mountain ranges, rushing rivers and Arctic tundra provide critical habitat for salmon, polar bears, caribou, black and grizzly bears, whales, walruses, migratory birds and many other species. They also are home to Alaska’s indigenous people, who depend on wildlands as a source of food and clean water.

Why Alaska and the Arctic

Alaska is America’s last great, wild frontier. In Alaska you can still see caribou migrating through vast valleys, salmon streams running through ancient forests and polar bears roaming icy shores of the Arctic Ocean.

Stories from Alaska

From the Tongass National Forest in the south to the Arctic coastal plain in the north, Alaska is full of inspiration, as the locals will tell you.

Experience Alaska

Some people spend their lives dreaming of a trip to Alaska. From misty islands in Alaska’s panhandle to the tundra covered plains of the Arctic Refuge, there is much to see.

Alaska focus areas

The Wilderness Society’s work in Alaska focuses primarily on four key areas that are at risk from oil and gas development and logging.

Other campaigns in Alaska

There is no time to waste and the scale of the threat is huge. Global warming is already affecting Alaska and will do so for decades to come.

Help protect Alaska and the Arctic

Alaska is renowned for some of the most beautiful, wild scenery in the world. A land of epic wildlife migrations and vast undeveloped wilderness, Alaska truly is the nation’s last, great wild frontier.

Make a donation to help protect Alaska and the Arctic.

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.