Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the nation’s largest wildlife refuge. It is a pristine landscape of tundra plains and dramatic mountain peaks.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge provides critical habitat for Arctic species, including caribou, bears, wolves and Arctic foxes. Our work aims to protect the refuge from oil drilling.

Why the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

America’s largest wildlife refuge is under pressure from oil companies that want to drill for oil in the crown jewel of our national refuge system.

Work we are doing

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the crown jewel of America’s wildlife refuge system. We are committed to protecting it from oil development.

Our partners

The Wilderness Society works with a number of local, regional and national conservation groups to help protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Caroline Mosley
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.
     
  • Tyler North

    The Bureau of Land Management has released its final version of its Planning 2.0 regulation, which has helped shape progress the BLM has made in its land use planning. The Wilderness Society applauds this effort and has already seen examples of smart planning in effect.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Yesterday, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed H.R. 4665, Outdoor Recreation’s Economic Contributions (REC) Act, which President Obama is expected to sign into law.

    This bill would ensure that the outdoor recreation economy is measured by the federal government and accounted for as part of the national gross domestic product (GDP).  The House of Representatives passed the bill earlier this month.