Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the nation’s largest wildlife refuge. It is a pristine landscape of tundra plains and dramatic mountain peaks.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge provides critical habitat for Arctic species, including caribou, bears, wolves and Arctic foxes. Our work aims to protect the refuge from oil drilling.

Why the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

America’s largest wildlife refuge is under pressure from oil companies that want to drill for oil in the crown jewel of our national refuge system.

Work we are doing

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the crown jewel of America’s wildlife refuge system. We are committed to protecting it from oil development.

Our partners

The Wilderness Society works with a number of local, regional and national conservation groups to help protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The agency rule was issued after a federal court ruled in 2013 that the Forest Service was in violation of an executive order on off-road vehicle management. The statement from The Wilderness Society follows:

  • Jennifer Dickson

    Despite major risks, obstacles and climate change concerns, the proposed plan would allow drilling for oil and gas in this remote, fragile and rapidly warming environment.

    The proposed Chukchi and Beaufort sea lease sales exclude relatively small areas where leasing would be prohibited.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The following statement is from Sally Miller, senior regional conservation representative with The Wilderness Society, regarding Representative Paul Cook’s introduction of legislation to create the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area and include it in the Bureau of Land Management’s system of National Conservation Lands: