BLM Conservation Lands

Some of the country’s most spectacular scenery and most valuable natural and cultural treasures can be found in the National Landscape Conservation System, also known as Conservation Lands.

Conservation Lands are America’s newest system of conservation and are managed by the Bureau of Land Management. As the crown jewels of all BLM lands, the National Landscape Conservation System plays a critical role in the heritage and economies of the western landscape.

Maps

Where are these Conservation Lands? This series of maps illustrates the location of these treasures within the public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

National Landscape Conservation System

These lands offer world-class outdoor recreation opportunities for hikers, paddlers, climbers and hunters in addition to outstanding cultural, ecological and scientific values. When the BLM prioritizes conservation of natural and cultural resources, as was intended by the creation of this system, we can be sure that these benefits are available for generations to come.

Threats and challenges

The Conservation System faces many challenges: it is understaffed, underfunded and vulnerable to shifting political priorities. Its lands and waters are threatened by development, vandalism and neglect as well. Reducing threats to BLM Conservation Lands is a priority for The Wilderness Society.

Management and guidance

How the BLM manages its Conservation Lands can impact how well they are preserved. We're working to make sure the BLM makes the right decisions about these great western landscapes. 

Publications and communication

Learn more about the National Landscape Conservation System through our blogs, press releases, reports and publications. 

Helpful links

 

  • Tim Woody

    President Barack Obama is expected to visit Anchorage, Alaska on Monday, where according to the White House he will address the State Department's GLACIER conference focused on a conversation around the Arctic and climate change. His visit to communities nearby will allow him to see first-hand the impacts that Native villagers and Alaskan communities are facing on a daily basis.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senator Cantwell, the ranking member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, has scheduled a hearing in Seattle on August 27 to examine wildfire issues.  Senator John Barrasso, who chairs that committee’s Public Lands, Forests and Mining subcommittee, is also scheduled to participate in the hearing.

  • Tim Woody

    When President Obama visits Alaska at the end of August, climate change will be a key focus of his trip. The Wilderness Society developed the following memo to provide a brief primer on key Alaska public lands where the effects of climate change can already be seen. This information is intended to ease your research and inform your reporting during the president’s visit. It focuses on four areas where the president’s administration has made major, important decisions: