BLM Conservation Lands

Some of the country’s most spectacular scenery and most valuable natural and cultural treasures can be found in the National Landscape Conservation System, also known as Conservation Lands.

Conservation Lands are America’s newest system of conservation and are managed by the Bureau of Land Management. As the crown jewels of all BLM lands, the National Landscape Conservation System plays a critical role in the heritage and economies of the western landscape.

Maps

Where are these Conservation Lands? This series of maps illustrates the location of these treasures within the public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

National Landscape Conservation System

These lands offer world-class outdoor recreation opportunities for hikers, paddlers, climbers and hunters in addition to outstanding cultural, ecological and scientific values. When the BLM prioritizes conservation of natural and cultural resources, as was intended by the creation of this system, we can be sure that these benefits are available for generations to come.

Threats and challenges

The Conservation System faces many challenges: it is understaffed, underfunded and vulnerable to shifting political priorities. Its lands and waters are threatened by development, vandalism and neglect as well. Reducing threats to BLM Conservation Lands is a priority for The Wilderness Society.

Management and guidance

How the BLM manages its Conservation Lands can impact how well they are preserved. We're working to make sure the BLM makes the right decisions about these great western landscapes. 

Publications and communication

Learn more about the National Landscape Conservation System through our blogs, press releases, reports and publications. 

Helpful links

 

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.