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  • When Aaron and Katherine (“K.K.”) Prussian moved to Thorne Bay, Alaska on Prince of Wales Island to take jobs with the Forest Service’s watershed restoration program, their work may have felt a bit like a stream in a forest of big trees — overshadowed.

    Thorne Bay was for many years home to one of North America’s largest logging camps, and timber production has remained a major focus of Forest Service activities there.

    But Aaron, a biologist, and K.K., a hydrologist, quickly seized an opportunity to make a real difference.

  • In a ceremony little noticed outside of central Florida, the state’s historic Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and surrounding mangroves were formally dedicated last month as part of the National Landscape Conservation System, which is the Bureau of Land Management’s version of the National Park System.

  • This feature was first published in the 2008 Wilderness Magazine. To receive the annual magazine and quarterly newsletters from The Wilderness Society, become a member today!

    Christopher Percy Collier is a Connecticut writer who has authored three regional guidebooks and has had stories published by National Geographic Traveler, Outside, and numerous other magazines.


    By Christopher Percy Collier

  • The Bush administration last week broke free of an often-used practice that places someone in a position largely for the purpose of undermining the mission of it. That has been especially true in regards to the environment. But the old dog performed a nice new trick when Bush’s Department of Agriculture named U.S. Forest Service Associate Chief Sally Collins to its new Office of Ecosystems and Markets.

  • Their populations have been ravaged, their lambs taken by disease. But now, after decades of decline, Idaho’s hammered bighorn populations could have a chance of making a comeback.

    Today, only about 2,000 bighorn sheep still live in Idaho, a miniscule number compared to the tens of thousands of bighorn that once lived in the state’s rugged hills and rocky crags.

    “Right now they’re quite a treat to see because there aren’t that many around,” said Craig Gehrke, The Wilderness Society’s Regional Director in Idaho.

  • This feature was first published in the 2008 Wilderness Magazine. To receive the annual magazine and quarterly newsletters from The Wilderness Society, become a member today!

    Darrell Knuffke, who writes from Mancos, Colorado, is a former Colorado journalist, U.S. Senate aide, and Wilderness Society vice president.


    By Darrell Knuffke

  • An attempt to halt the Bush Administration’s eleventh-hour plundering of Utah’s iconic redrock canyon country has resulted in a last minute reprieve from oil and gas leasing for places like Nine Mile and Desolation Canyon, as well as other beloved public lands in Utah.

    The lands contain vast numbers of historic sites, intricate fragile rock formations and countless remote canyons that symbolize the wildness of the West.

  • In November, we told you about sweeping environmental roll-backs the Bush administration is rushing through in its final months in office. Since then, and just as expected, the news has not been good.

    In the short weeks since the presidential election, the administration has finalized numerous land management plans, regulations and policy changes that could severely damage our wild lands for decades to come.

  • Sen. Ken Salazar, President-elect Barack Obama’s nominee for Secretary of Interior, has been a bridge-building environmental leader in Colorado for over a decade and a personally committed land steward before that. He understands the land, water, and people of the west and the intricate connections among those key features of our natural and social landscape.

  • In an attempt to halt the Bush Administration’s eleventh-hour plundering of Utah’s iconic redrock canyon country, The Wilderness Society on Dec. 17 joined six other conservation groups in a lawsuit aimed at stopping the administration’s upcoming oil and natural gas lease sale.

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