California

From stunning Sierra forests to vast desert vistas, California has spectacular wildlands, many within a short drive from major urban centers.

We are working to preserve and protect California’s spectacular wilderness, to restore critical wildlife habitat and to address the impacts of climate change.

Areas of focus:

San Gabriel Mountains

The San Gabriel Mountains — less than an hour from downtown Los Angeles — are Southern California’s recreation backyard. Our work aims to create a national recreation area in these well visited mountains.

Sierra Nevada

The Sierra Nevada forms California’s mountainous backbone. Many of Its renowned wildlands – near  Yosemite and Sequoia parks – still need protection, restoration and wise management.

California Desert

With spectacular pastel vistas, spring wildflowers and popular destinations like Death Valley and Joshua Tree national parks, the California Desert is an amazing place to discover. Much of the desert is still in need of protection.

Central Coast

An outdoor recreation gem, the Central Coast includes natural and cultural attractions amid mountain peaks, wildflower-dappled grasslands and wild chaparral hills. We are working to protect some of the most unique spots.

Other campaigns

We're also working on a number of other campaigns in California, including:

  • Berryessa Snow Mountan
  • Bodie Hills
  • Northern San Diego County

Help protect California

You can help ensure that California wildlands remain protected for generations to come.

Make a donation to help protect California.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.