California

From stunning Sierra forests to vast desert vistas, California has spectacular wildlands, many within a short drive from major urban centers.

We are working to preserve and protect California’s spectacular wilderness, to restore critical wildlife habitat and to address the impacts of climate change.

Why California

California’s is one of the most geographically diverse states in the nation — home to the highest and lowest points in the continental United States, the most climate zones as well as the most species. While it's also home to the most people, much of California is still wild and we are working to keep it that way. 

Stories from California

More people live in California than in any other state. They are of all colors, beliefs and backgrounds. But their stories agree on one point: wilderness matters.

Experience California

With 25 National Park units, 18 national forests, more than 15 million acres of Bureau of Land Management lands and 270 state parks and beaches, you'll never run out of things to do in California.

California focus areas

At The Wilderness Society, we are working in three key focus areas in the state — the Sierra Nevada, the San Gabriel Mountains and the California Desert.

Other campaigns

We're also working on a number of other campaigns in California, including:

  • Berryessa Snow Mountan
  • Pinnacles
  • Bodie Hills
  • Southern Los Padres Forest
  • Northern San Diego County

Help protect California

You can help ensure that California wildlands remain protected for generations to come.

Make a donation to help protect California.

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts. 

  • The Honorable Doc Hastings, Chairman
    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources
    1324 Longworth House Office Building
    Washington, DC 20515
     
    The Honorable Peter DeFazio, Ranking Member
    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources
    1324 Longworth House Building
    Washington, DC 20515
     
    Dear Chairman Hastings, Ranking Member DeFazio and Members of the Committee:
     
  • These comments were submitted by The Wilderness Society and our partners on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the TransWest Express Transmission Line. The proposed TransWest Express Transmission Project would deliver renewable energy produced in Wyoming to the Desert Southwest region, and would traverse Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada along its 725-mile route.