Careers and Internships

Put your skills and talents to work conserving wild places.

We offer a very competitive salary and benefits package, including health and dental insurance, retirement plans, and paid time off. If one of our openings interests you, please send your resume and other requirements as requested in the posting. 

The Wilderness Society is an equal opportunity employer and actively works to ensure fair and equal treatment of its employees and constituents regardless of differences based on an individual’s race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, veteran status, sexual orientation, disability, genetic information, political affiliation, or any other protected characteristic. 

Employment Opportunities

The Wilderness Society is currently recruiting for the following positions:

CONSERVATION

New Mexico Public Lands Community Organizer- Full Time
Location: Albuquerque, NM

COMMUNICATIONS

Director, Energy Communications- Full Time
Location: Washington, DC

Communications Manager, Northwest Region- Full Time
Location: Boise, ID

PHILANTHROPY

Northwest Senior Philanthropy Officer- Full Time
Location: Seattle, WA

Internship Opportunities

The following internships are available at The Wilderness Society.  Each opportunity is designed for undergraduate or graduate students in the summer, spring, and fall semesters; please see individual postings for semester-specific information and application deadlines.  Unless otherwise noted, all internships are unpaid.

Summer Semester 2016

National Monuments Constituency Building Internship
Location: Durango, CO

To Apply: Please email a resume, cover letter, and recent writing sample as noted in the specific posting to internships@tws.org. Please use the subject line to indicate the internship program you are applying for.

Click here to learn more about our internship program

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.