Climate Change in Montana

Montana’s Crown of the Continent is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change, and the region’s natural diversity makes it more resilient to climate impacts.

Changes in our climate have impacted the Crown from the valley bottoms to the mountaintops. Its glaciers, snowfields, forests and wildlife species tell the story of warming temperatures and drier conditions throughout this landscape.

What is climate change?

Changes to the things we care about – land, water, wildlife and the people who depend on them – demand that we better understand and face climate change.

Evidence and impacts

Over eighty percent of the glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park have been lost since 1850, and the few remaining are expected to disappear within 15 years.

Case studies and success stories

Montana is filled with examples of people who are finding ways to address climate change - both individually and with their neighbors and co-workers.

The Crown, climate change and you

Protecting the Crown from the impacts of a changing climate will take the efforts of all of us.

  • Max Greenberg

    The Wilderness Society is pleased to join California desert residents, local elected officials, tribal representatives and community leaders dedicating the newly designated Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow and Castle Mountains National Monuments. United States Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell; California Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird; Congressman Raul Ruiz (CA-36); Jody Noiron, Forest Supervisor, San Bernardino National Forest, U.S.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    During its history, the state of Idaho has sold off more than 1.7 million acres of land to private interests, according to an analysis of land sale data by The Wilderness Society released this week.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.