Climate Change in Montana

Montana’s Crown of the Continent is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change, and the region’s natural diversity makes it more resilient to climate impacts.

Changes in our climate have impacted the Crown from the valley bottoms to the mountaintops. Its glaciers, snowfields, forests and wildlife species tell the story of warming temperatures and drier conditions throughout this landscape.

What is climate change?

Changes to the things we care about – land, water, wildlife and the people who depend on them – demand that we better understand and face climate change.

Evidence and impacts

Over eighty percent of the glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park have been lost since 1850, and the few remaining are expected to disappear within 15 years.

Case studies and success stories

Montana is filled with examples of people who are finding ways to address climate change - both individually and with their neighbors and co-workers.

The Crown, climate change and you

Protecting the Crown from the impacts of a changing climate will take the efforts of all of us.

  • DJ Tyson

    Today, a coalition of conservation groups and others announced that a historic number of comments and petitions of support have been submitted to the Department of the Interior in support of Bears Ears National Monument.  Despite the entirely inadequate 15-day period ending on May 26th provided for comments, more than 685,000 comments in support of Bears Ears National Monument have been collected.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society can provide background, commentary and photos on the Trump administration review of Bears Ears and other national monuments across the country. Our experts can also offer regional insights and historical context regarding the use of the Antiquities Act to protect America’s natural, cultural and scientific treasures. 

    Please feel free to download and use any of the following digital resources in your coverage with appropriate credit.

  • Michael Reinemer

    At a time when America’s parks and other public lands desperately need greater investments and protections, the proposed Trump budget represents a retreat from common sense. Thoughtless cuts proposed for federal land agencies fly in the face of the public’s love for shared national lands and waters.