Climate Change in Montana

Montana’s Crown of the Continent is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change, and the region’s natural diversity makes it more resilient to climate impacts.

Changes in our climate have impacted the Crown from the valley bottoms to the mountaintops. Its glaciers, snowfields, forests and wildlife species tell the story of warming temperatures and drier conditions throughout this landscape.

What is climate change?

Changes to the things we care about – land, water, wildlife and the people who depend on them – demand that we better understand and face climate change.

Evidence and impacts

Over eighty percent of the glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park have been lost since 1850, and the few remaining are expected to disappear within 15 years.

Case studies and success stories

Montana is filled with examples of people who are finding ways to address climate change - both individually and with their neighbors and co-workers.

The Crown, climate change and you

Protecting the Crown from the impacts of a changing climate will take the efforts of all of us.

  • Tim Woody

    Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s bill to authorize oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge has advanced out of committee and is poised to be attached to the Republican tax package. It will then go before the full Senate for a filibuster-proof vote requiring only a simple 51-vote majority to pass.

  • Kate Mackay

    Today a national coalition of sportsmen, recreation, business and conservation groups calls on the Department of the Interior and Secretary Ryan Zinke to make good on its promise to the American public that it is against the widespread sale or transfer of 445 million acres of public lands under the department’s management authority.

  • Tim Woody

    The U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee today approved a bill that would allow oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The bill’s supporters claim such drilling would raise $1 billion in revenue to offset tax cuts, despite best estimates indicating that revenue target is highly unrealistic.

    In response to today’s committee vote, The Wilderness Society issued the following statement from its president, Jamie Williams: