Climate Change in Montana

Montana’s Crown of the Continent is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change, and the region’s natural diversity makes it more resilient to climate impacts.

Changes in our climate have impacted the Crown from the valley bottoms to the mountaintops. Its glaciers, snowfields, forests and wildlife species tell the story of warming temperatures and drier conditions throughout this landscape.

What is climate change?

Changes to the things we care about – land, water, wildlife and the people who depend on them – demand that we better understand and face climate change.

Evidence and impacts

Over eighty percent of the glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park have been lost since 1850, and the few remaining are expected to disappear within 15 years.

Case studies and success stories

Montana is filled with examples of people who are finding ways to address climate change - both individually and with their neighbors and co-workers.

The Crown, climate change and you

Protecting the Crown from the impacts of a changing climate will take the efforts of all of us.

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.