Climate Change in Montana

Montana’s Crown of the Continent is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change, and the region’s natural diversity makes it more resilient to climate impacts.

Changes in our climate have impacted the Crown from the valley bottoms to the mountaintops. Its glaciers, snowfields, forests and wildlife species tell the story of warming temperatures and drier conditions throughout this landscape.

What is climate change?

Changes to the things we care about – land, water, wildlife and the people who depend on them – demand that we better understand and face climate change.

Evidence and impacts

Over eighty percent of the glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park have been lost since 1850, and the few remaining are expected to disappear within 15 years.

Case studies and success stories

Montana is filled with examples of people who are finding ways to address climate change - both individually and with their neighbors and co-workers.

The Crown, climate change and you

Protecting the Crown from the impacts of a changing climate will take the efforts of all of us.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Strayed will receive the We Are the Wild Inspiration Award, which recognizes a person who embodies the spirit of wilderness and its transformative power.

    Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society, said, “In this 50th anniversary year of the Wilderness Act, we present this award to underscore the importance of inspiring people to discover and care for our wild lands. Today we honor Cheryl Strayed for her remarkable story and for inspiring new generations to experience wilderness, which forms the backbone of the American spirit.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    President Obama will use his executive authority to create the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument, an action that will improve outdoor recreation, safeguard vital water supplies and protect wildlife in the backyard of Los Angeles – the nation’s most populous county.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society applauds the Obama Administration for advancing bipartisan efforts to further protect ocean ecosystems and their scientific value by using the Antiquities Act to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, an undisturbed island and atoll chain located 1,000 miles southwest of Hawaii. The proclamation builds on the approximately 83,000 square-mile national monument initially designated by President George W. Bush in 2009.