Colorado Plateau Focus Areas

The Colorado Plateau's diverse ecosystems sprawl across more than 100 million acres in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado.

Red rock canyons and pinon dotted mesas cover large portions of the plateau, while aspen trees and alpine meadows spring up in others. The Wilderness Society focuses its conservation efforts on protecting some of the most unique places in this region.

Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region is found in northwestern Colorado, southwestern Wyoming and northeastern Utah. This area includes places that are protected, like Dinosaur National Monument, and other areas like the Vermilion Basin that still need protection.

Dolores River Basin

The Dolores River Basin stretches from western Colorado down to the Colorado-New Mexico border. We’re working in this area to protect the spectacular San Juan Mountains and the wildlife and outdoor adventure opportunities they contain.

Grand Canyon and Arizona Strip

The Grand Canyon is one of the most treasured places in America. We’re working to make sure that the surrounding landscape stays protected as well.

Southeastern Utah

With national parks like Arches and Canyonlands, southeastern Utah is a recreation hotspot. We’re working to keep oil and gas drilling away from some of the spectacular landscapes in the region.

  • Neil Shader

    New legislation introduced today in the House and the Senate would undermine state and federal planning efforts, nearly complete, to conserve the greater sage grouse and perpetuate uncertainty faced by all westerners, according to The Wilderness Society. The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relations director for The Wilderness Society.

  • Neil Shader

    Authorization for LWCF runs out on September 30 2015.

    Today, Earth Day, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on “reauthorization and potential reforms” to LWCF. Funded primarily by offshore oil royalties—not taxpayer dollars—the program has had strong bipartisan support since its enactment in 1964. The Wilderness Society strongly supports several bills to reauthorize LWCF including S. 890, S. 338 and H.R. 1814, now pending in Congress.

  • Neil Shader

    Proactive, cooperative conservation measures could be a model for protections across the West

    The following statement can be attributed to Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy and planning for The Wilderness Society, regarding the Department of Interior’s decision to not add the bi-state greater sage grouse population to the Endangered Species List.