Colorado Plateau Focus Areas

The Colorado Plateau's diverse ecosystems sprawl across more than 100 million acres in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado.

Red rock canyons and pinon dotted mesas cover large portions of the plateau, while aspen trees and alpine meadows spring up in others. The Wilderness Society focuses its conservation efforts on protecting some of the most unique places in this region.

Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region is found in northwestern Colorado, southwestern Wyoming and northeastern Utah. This area includes places that are protected, like Dinosaur National Monument, and other areas like the Vermilion Basin that still need protection.

Dolores River Basin

The Dolores River Basin stretches from western Colorado down to the Colorado-New Mexico border. We’re working in this area to protect the spectacular San Juan Mountains and the wildlife and outdoor adventure opportunities they contain.

Grand Canyon and Arizona Strip

The Grand Canyon is one of the most treasured places in America. We’re working to make sure that the surrounding landscape stays protected as well.

Southeastern Utah

With national parks like Arches and Canyonlands, southeastern Utah is a recreation hotspot. We’re working to keep oil and gas drilling away from some of the spectacular landscapes in the region.

  • Michael Reinemer
    The Wilderness Society today praised Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) for introducing important legislation that would conserve more than 58,000 acres of public lands in Colorado’s Eagle and Summit Counties including approximately 40,000 acres of wilderness and more than 18,000 acres as special management areas.  
     
  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate.