Colorado Plateau Focus Areas

The Colorado Plateau's diverse ecosystems sprawl across more than 100 million acres in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado.

Red rock canyons and pinon dotted mesas cover large portions of the plateau, while aspen trees and alpine meadows spring up in others. The Wilderness Society focuses its conservation efforts on protecting some of the most unique places in this region.

Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region is found in northwestern Colorado, southwestern Wyoming and northeastern Utah. This area includes places that are protected, like Dinosaur National Monument, and other areas like the Vermilion Basin that still need protection.

Dolores River Basin

The Dolores River Basin stretches from western Colorado down to the Colorado-New Mexico border. We’re working in this area to protect the spectacular San Juan Mountains and the wildlife and outdoor adventure opportunities they contain.

Grand Canyon and Arizona Strip

The Grand Canyon is one of the most treasured places in America. We’re working to make sure that the surrounding landscape stays protected as well.

Southeastern Utah

With national parks like Arches and Canyonlands, southeastern Utah is a recreation hotspot. We’re working to keep oil and gas drilling away from some of the spectacular landscapes in the region.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.