Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau is one of the last remnants of the Wild West. This untamed area covers parts of Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico

More than 40 million people come to the Colorado Plateau every year. Whether it is to hike, camp, paddle or sightsee, they get to experience the landscapes for which the West is famous.

Why the Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau is a living geology lesson and home to some of the West's greatest wonders, including the Grand Canyon, Utah's redrock country and Mesa Verde National Park. Yet, no matter how awe-inspiring, the lands of the Plateau are not safe from the threat of oil and gas development and mining.

Stories from the Colorado Plateau

Find out more about the Colorado Plateau, from the people that live, work and play there.

Experience the Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau includes rugged landscapes you'll not see anywhere else. Home to some of the West's best-known national parks, national monuments and wilderness areas, the Colorado Plateau has something for everyone.

Focus areas

The Colorado Plateau is an incredibly diverse network of landscapes. The Wilderness Society works to protect everything from red rock canyons to high alpine forests and mountain peaks.

Other campaigns

In addition to working to protect lands in areas above, we also work in the Colorado Plateau to make sure that oil and gas drilling is done responsibly. We’re also working to make sure that lands that are already protected are managed so that they stay that way.

Help Protect the Colorado Plateau

There are many ways you can help ensure the Colorado Plateau remains a vibrant place for generations to come.

Make a donation to help protect the Colorado Plateau.

  • Emily Linroth

    Today, several measures aimed to roll back protections on our nation’s public lands were defeated in the Senate as part of the Keystone XL Pipeline bill. These amendments would have, among other effects, dismantled permanent protection for millions of acres of wilderness quality lands (S.A. 166) that await protection and weakened the Antiquities Act (S.A. 132), a law used by 16 presidents to protect places such as the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty. 

  • Michael Reinemer

    The agency rule was issued after a federal court ruled in 2013 that the Forest Service was in violation of an executive order on off-road vehicle management. The statement from The Wilderness Society follows:

  • Jennifer Dickson

    Despite major risks, obstacles and climate change concerns, the proposed plan would allow drilling for oil and gas in this remote, fragile and rapidly warming environment.

    The proposed Chukchi and Beaufort sea lease sales exclude relatively small areas where leasing would be prohibited.