Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau is one of the last remnants of the Wild West. This untamed area covers parts of Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico

More than 40 million people come to the Colorado Plateau every year. Whether it is to hike, camp, paddle or sightsee, they get to experience the landscapes for which the West is famous.

Why the Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau is a living geology lesson and home to some of the West's greatest wonders, including the Grand Canyon, Utah's redrock country and Mesa Verde National Park. Yet, no matter how awe-inspiring, the lands of the Plateau are not safe from the threat of oil and gas development and mining.

Stories from the Colorado Plateau

Find out more about the Colorado Plateau, from the people that live, work and play there.

Experience the Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau includes rugged landscapes you'll not see anywhere else. Home to some of the West's best-known national parks, national monuments and wilderness areas, the Colorado Plateau has something for everyone.

Focus areas

The Colorado Plateau is an incredibly diverse network of landscapes. The Wilderness Society works to protect everything from red rock canyons to high alpine forests and mountain peaks.

Other campaigns

In addition to working to protect lands in areas above, we also work in the Colorado Plateau to make sure that oil and gas drilling is done responsibly. We’re also working to make sure that lands that are already protected are managed so that they stay that way.

Help Protect the Colorado Plateau

There are many ways you can help ensure the Colorado Plateau remains a vibrant place for generations to come.

Make a donation to help protect the Colorado Plateau.

  • The 115th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.