Conservation Funding

When government funding exists for important conservation projects, there’s a better chance that wilderness will be protected, studied and managed well.

Funding for conservation projects ends up in many different places, from trail maintenance to habitat restoration. For example, it can be used for:

  • Managing national parks
  • Conducting research on climate change in wildlife refuges
  • Buying new land that can be protected as public land by the Bureau of Land Management
  • Keeping visitor centers opened and maintained

Making sure the federal budget provides adequate funding for this kind of work is key to keeping wilderness protected.

Why conservation funding

Conservation work requires significant funding. Unfortunately, Congress constantly targets funds dedicated to conservation. We work to ensure lawmakers set aside adequate resources to keep public lands healthy and accessible.

Federal funding priorities

Each year members of Congress and the president make budgetary decisions about how federal tax dollars and fees are distributed for land and water conservation. Conservation funds are part of the president’s budget as well as legislative priorities managed by Congress.

Our conservation funding priorities

Certain funding priorities help ensure the protection of future wilderness areas. These include the federal ‘green budget’ and funding for land and water conservation.

Conservation funding FAQs

Have more questions about conservation funding? Our conservation FAQs can help.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.