Conservation Funding

When government funding exists for important conservation projects, there’s a better chance that wilderness will be protected, studied and managed well.

Funding for conservation projects ends up in many different places, from trail maintenance to habitat restoration. For example, it can be used for:

  • Managing national parks
  • Conducting research on climate change in wildlife refuges
  • Buying new land that can be protected as public land by the Bureau of Land Management
  • Keeping visitor centers opened and maintained

Making sure the federal budget provides adequate funding for this kind of work is key to keeping wilderness protected.

Why conservation funding

Conservation work requires significant funding. Unfortunately, Congress constantly targets funds dedicated to conservation. We work to ensure lawmakers set aside adequate resources to keep public lands healthy and accessible.

Federal funding priorities

Each year members of Congress and the president make budgetary decisions about how federal tax dollars and fees are distributed for land and water conservation. Conservation funds are part of the president’s budget as well as legislative priorities managed by Congress.

Our conservation funding priorities

Certain funding priorities help ensure the protection of future wilderness areas. These include the federal ‘green budget’ and funding for land and water conservation.

Conservation funding FAQs

Have more questions about conservation funding? Our conservation FAQs can help.

  • DJ Tyson

    Today, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke addressed a meeting of the Western Governors Association in Montana. In response, Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy at The Wilderness Society said:

  • Michael Reinemer

    ANCHORAGE, ALASKA (June 27, 2017) – Today the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources voted in favor of H.R. 218, a bill that would allow construction of an unnecessary road through a designated wilderness area in Alaska’s Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. In response, The Wilderness Society issues the following statement from Alaska Regional Director Nicole Whittington-Evans:

  • Kate Mackay

    Today the House Natural Resources Committee marked up and passed H.R. 2936, the “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” which opens America’s national forests and roadless areas to expedited logging—a direct attack on the nation’s last old growth stands, clean drinking water for millions and quiet habitat for wildlife.