Conservation Funding

When government funding exists for important conservation projects, there’s a better chance that wilderness will be protected, studied and managed well.

Funding for conservation projects ends up in many different places, from trail maintenance to habitat restoration. For example, it can be used for:

  • Managing national parks
  • Conducting research on climate change in wildlife refuges
  • Buying new land that can be protected as public land by the Bureau of Land Management
  • Keeping visitor centers opened and maintained

Making sure the federal budget provides adequate funding for this kind of work is key to keeping wilderness protected.

Why conservation funding

Conservation work requires significant funding. Unfortunately, Congress constantly targets funds dedicated to conservation. We work to ensure lawmakers set aside adequate resources to keep public lands healthy and accessible.

Federal funding priorities

Each year members of Congress and the president make budgetary decisions about how federal tax dollars and fees are distributed for land and water conservation. Conservation funds are part of the president’s budget as well as legislative priorities managed by Congress.

Our conservation funding priorities

Certain funding priorities help ensure the protection of future wilderness areas. These include the federal ‘green budget’ and funding for land and water conservation.

Conservation funding FAQs

Have more questions about conservation funding? Our conservation FAQs can help.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today, Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society, issued the following statement on the expected nomination of U.S. Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers for Secretary of the Interior.
     
    “Across the political spectrum, Americans deeply cherish our shared public lands and want to see them protected for future generations. Turning the keys to our nation’s public lands over to someone who has called for drilling and development in pristine landscapes is not what most Americans want. 

  • Caroline Mosley

    Unfortunately, she has voted for measures that would prevent taxpayers from receiving a fair price for resources mined on public lands, prioritized drilling public lands over recreational uses, and allowed companies to bypass certain Clean Air Act provisions for offshore drilling. It’s not all bad news, she has supported renewable energy and cosponsored legislation to promote responsible siting of wind and solar on public lands, but the balance sheet isn’t good. Here’s a sampling of the rest of her record.

  • Tyler North

    Today, the Senate took its final steps to secure the National Defense Authorization Act – without the presence of a provision that would have undermined collaborative plans to conserve the sagebrush ecosystem and hampered the sage-grouse’s chances at survival.