Conservation Funding

When government funding exists for important conservation projects, there’s a better chance that wilderness will be protected, studied and managed well.

Funding for conservation projects ends up in many different places, from trail maintenance to habitat restoration. For example, it can be used for:

  • Managing national parks
  • Conducting research on climate change in wildlife refuges
  • Buying new land that can be protected as public land by the Bureau of Land Management
  • Keeping visitor centers opened and maintained

Making sure the federal budget provides adequate funding for this kind of work is key to keeping wilderness protected.

Why conservation funding

Conservation work requires significant funding. Unfortunately, Congress constantly targets funds dedicated to conservation. We work to ensure lawmakers set aside adequate resources to keep public lands healthy and accessible.

Federal funding priorities

Each year members of Congress and the president make budgetary decisions about how federal tax dollars and fees are distributed for land and water conservation. Conservation funds are part of the president’s budget as well as legislative priorities managed by Congress.

Our conservation funding priorities

Certain funding priorities help ensure the protection of future wilderness areas. These include the federal ‘green budget’ and funding for land and water conservation.

Conservation funding FAQs

Have more questions about conservation funding? Our conservation FAQs can help.

  • Neil Shader

    New legislation introduced today in the House and the Senate would undermine state and federal planning efforts, nearly complete, to conserve the greater sage grouse and perpetuate uncertainty faced by all westerners, according to The Wilderness Society. The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relations director for The Wilderness Society.

  • Neil Shader

    Authorization for LWCF runs out on September 30 2015.

    Today, Earth Day, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on “reauthorization and potential reforms” to LWCF. Funded primarily by offshore oil royalties—not taxpayer dollars—the program has had strong bipartisan support since its enactment in 1964. The Wilderness Society strongly supports several bills to reauthorize LWCF including S. 890, S. 338 and H.R. 1814, now pending in Congress.

  • Neil Shader

    Proactive, cooperative conservation measures could be a model for protections across the West

    The following statement can be attributed to Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy and planning for The Wilderness Society, regarding the Department of Interior’s decision to not add the bi-state greater sage grouse population to the Endangered Species List.