Conservation Funding

When government funding exists for important conservation projects, there’s a better chance that wilderness will be protected, studied and managed well.

Funding for conservation projects ends up in many different places, from trail maintenance to habitat restoration. For example, it can be used for:

  • Managing national parks
  • Conducting research on climate change in wildlife refuges
  • Buying new land that can be protected as public land by the Bureau of Land Management
  • Keeping visitor centers opened and maintained

Making sure the federal budget provides adequate funding for this kind of work is key to keeping wilderness protected.

Why conservation funding

Conservation work requires significant funding. Unfortunately, Congress constantly targets funds dedicated to conservation. We work to ensure lawmakers set aside adequate resources to keep public lands healthy and accessible.

Federal funding priorities

Each year members of Congress and the president make budgetary decisions about how federal tax dollars and fees are distributed for land and water conservation. Conservation funds are part of the president’s budget as well as legislative priorities managed by Congress.

Our conservation funding priorities

Certain funding priorities help ensure the protection of future wilderness areas. These include the federal ‘green budget’ and funding for land and water conservation.

Conservation funding FAQs

Have more questions about conservation funding? Our conservation FAQs can help.

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2016 and outlines dozens of examples of programs that have been shortchanged in recent years. 

  • 2014 Audited Financial Statements