Conservation Funding

When government funding exists for important conservation projects, there’s a better chance that wilderness will be protected, studied and managed well.

Funding for conservation projects ends up in many different places, from trail maintenance to habitat restoration. For example, it can be used for:

  • Managing national parks
  • Conducting research on climate change in wildlife refuges
  • Buying new land that can be protected as public land by the Bureau of Land Management
  • Keeping visitor centers opened and maintained

Making sure the federal budget provides adequate funding for this kind of work is key to keeping wilderness protected.

Why conservation funding

Conservation work requires significant funding. Unfortunately, Congress constantly targets funds dedicated to conservation. We work to ensure lawmakers set aside adequate resources to keep public lands healthy and accessible.

Federal funding priorities

Each year members of Congress and the president make budgetary decisions about how federal tax dollars and fees are distributed for land and water conservation. Conservation funds are part of the president’s budget as well as legislative priorities managed by Congress.

Our conservation funding priorities

Certain funding priorities help ensure the protection of future wilderness areas. These include the federal ‘green budget’ and funding for land and water conservation.

Conservation funding FAQs

Have more questions about conservation funding? Our conservation FAQs can help.

  • The 115th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.