Crown of the Continent Focus Areas

The Crown of the Continent is a spectacularly wild portion of Montana's Rockies — just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled through it more than 200 years ago.

At Wilderness, our work in the Crown of the Continent focuses on three important areas.

Northwestern Crown

The Northwestern Crown is a hidden, unprotected gem where conservation has been overlooked for too long.   

Southwestern Crown

We are righting decades of abuse and neglect in the Southwestern Crown by restoring water quality and protecting wild places.

Rocky Mountain Front

This wild corner of the Crown has a quality of life and land that’s all its own. We are making sure it stays that way.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society strongly supports bipartisan legislation, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 (S. 235, H.R. 167), to fix a budgetary problem called “fire borrowing.”  This is a destructive cycle in which the Forest Service is forced to take funds from other forest programs when its allotted wildfire funds are used up, essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul to put out fires in our national forests.