Crown of the Continent

In Montana's northwest, the rugged Rockies give birth to the headwaters of North America. It's here in the Crown of the Continent that waters of the Pacific, Atlantic and Hudson Bay begin.

The Crown of the Continent contains the wildest part of Montana's Rocky Mountains and is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled through it more than 200 years ago. We're working to protect all of this.

Why the Crown of the Continent

The Crown encompasses Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and is one of only two intact ecosystems remaining in the lower 48 states where grizzlies, elk, moose and wolves still thrive. But development and climate change threaten this vulnerable ecosystem.

Stories from the Crown

Discover the Crown of the Continent through the stories of local residents who rely on the wildland.

Experience the Crown

The Crown of the Continent is a world-class gateway to adventure in a land that stands still in time.

Focus areas

We protect the most deserving wild places by employing conservation solutions that are long-lasting.     

Other campaigns

The Crown is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change. 

Help protect the Crown

After years of dedicated conservation work, we are more prepared than ever to protect the Crown of the Continent, but we can only do it with your help.

Make a donation to help protect the Crown of the Continent.

  • Tim Woody

    Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s bill to authorize oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge has advanced out of committee and is poised to be attached to the Republican tax package. It will then go before the full Senate for a filibuster-proof vote requiring only a simple 51-vote majority to pass.

  • Kate Mackay

    Today a national coalition of sportsmen, recreation, business and conservation groups calls on the Department of the Interior and Secretary Ryan Zinke to make good on its promise to the American public that it is against the widespread sale or transfer of 445 million acres of public lands under the department’s management authority.

  • Tim Woody

    The U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee today approved a bill that would allow oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The bill’s supporters claim such drilling would raise $1 billion in revenue to offset tax cuts, despite best estimates indicating that revenue target is highly unrealistic.

    In response to today’s committee vote, The Wilderness Society issued the following statement from its president, Jamie Williams: