Crown of the Continent

In Montana's northwest, the rugged Rockies give birth to the headwaters of North America. It's here in the Crown of the Continent that waters of the Pacific, Atlantic and Hudson Bay begin.

The Crown of the Continent contains the wildest part of Montana's Rocky Mountains and is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled through it more than 200 years ago. We're working to protect all of this.

Why the Crown of the Continent

The Crown encompasses Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and is one of only two intact ecosystems remaining in the lower 48 states where grizzlies, elk, moose and wolves still thrive. But development and climate change threaten this vulnerable ecosystem.

Stories from the Crown

Discover the Crown of the Continent through the stories of local residents who rely on the wildland.

Experience the Crown

The Crown of the Continent is a world-class gateway to adventure in a land that stands still in time.

Focus areas

We protect the most deserving wild places by employing conservation solutions that are long-lasting.     

Other campaigns

The Crown is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change. 

Help protect the Crown

After years of dedicated conservation work, we are more prepared than ever to protect the Crown of the Continent, but we can only do it with your help.

Make a donation to help protect the Crown of the Continent.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.