Crown of the Continent

In Montana's northwest, the rugged Rockies give birth to the headwaters of North America. It's here in the Crown of the Continent that waters of the Pacific, Atlantic and Hudson Bay begin.

The Crown of the Continent contains the wildest part of Montana's Rocky Mountains and is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled through it more than 200 years ago. We're working to protect all of this.

Why the Crown of the Continent

The Crown encompasses Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and is one of only two intact ecosystems remaining in the lower 48 states where grizzlies, elk, moose and wolves still thrive. But development and climate change threaten this vulnerable ecosystem.

Stories from the Crown

Discover the Crown of the Continent through the stories of local residents who rely on the wildland.

Experience the Crown

The Crown of the Continent is a world-class gateway to adventure in a land that stands still in time.

Focus areas

We protect the most deserving wild places by employing conservation solutions that are long-lasting.     

Other campaigns

The Crown is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change. 

Help protect the Crown

After years of dedicated conservation work, we are more prepared than ever to protect the Crown of the Continent, but we can only do it with your help.

Make a donation to help protect the Crown of the Continent.

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.