Crown of the Continent

In Montana's northwest, the rugged Rockies give birth to the headwaters of North America. It's here in the Crown of the Continent that waters of the Pacific, Atlantic and Hudson Bay begin.

The Crown of the Continent contains the wildest part of Montana's Rocky Mountains and is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled through it more than 200 years ago. We're working to protect all of this.

Why the Crown of the Continent

The Crown encompasses Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and is one of only two intact ecosystems remaining in the lower 48 states where grizzlies, elk, moose and wolves still thrive. But development and climate change threaten this vulnerable ecosystem.

Stories from the Crown

Discover the Crown of the Continent through the stories of local residents who rely on the wildland.

Experience the Crown

The Crown of the Continent is a world-class gateway to adventure in a land that stands still in time.

Focus areas

We protect the most deserving wild places by employing conservation solutions that are long-lasting.     

Other campaigns

The Crown is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change. 

Help protect the Crown

After years of dedicated conservation work, we are more prepared than ever to protect the Crown of the Continent, but we can only do it with your help.

Make a donation to help protect the Crown of the Continent.

  • Anastasia Greene

    On Monday, September 26, the Colorado Bureau of Land Management state office announced that it will be pursuing a master leasing plan in Southwest Colorado. The statement comes after the agency engaged in an unprecedented public outreach campaign that consisted of a series of public meetings and the formation of a public working group that resulted in the submission of hundreds of comments to the local Tres Rios field office.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today the House of Representatives approved H.R. 845, the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act by Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Tim Walz (D-MN). The legislation would keep more trails across the nation open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteer and partner organizations and providing increased focus on a handful of priority areas around the country.

  • Michael Reinemer

    With very few legislative days left in the 114th Congress, this bill has no chance of being adopted and would do too little to protect wild, cultural and historic lands, including the critically important Bears Ears area.