Crown of the Continent

In Montana's northwest, the rugged Rockies give birth to the headwaters of North America. It's here in the Crown of the Continent that waters of the Pacific, Atlantic and Hudson Bay begin.

The Crown of the Continent contains the wildest part of Montana's Rocky Mountains and is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled through it more than 200 years ago. We're working to protect all of this.

Why the Crown of the Continent

The Crown encompasses Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and is one of only two intact ecosystems remaining in the lower 48 states where grizzlies, elk, moose and wolves still thrive. But development and climate change threaten this vulnerable ecosystem.

Stories from the Crown

Discover the Crown of the Continent through the stories of local residents who rely on the wildland.

Experience the Crown

The Crown of the Continent is a world-class gateway to adventure in a land that stands still in time.

Focus areas

We protect the most deserving wild places by employing conservation solutions that are long-lasting.     

Other campaigns

The Crown is a natural laboratory for scientists to study climate change. 

Help protect the Crown

After years of dedicated conservation work, we are more prepared than ever to protect the Crown of the Continent, but we can only do it with your help.

Make a donation to help protect the Crown of the Continent.

  • For this report, The Wilderness Society reviewed data from more than 16,000 parcels auctioned off by the state. The analysis details more than a century of land sales that have privatized and closed off an amount of once-accessible lands nearly the size of the entire Sawtooth National Forest. Parcels often end up in the hands of some of Idaho’s biggest industries, while others have been turned into gravel pits, strip malls and even exclusive private fishing retreats and lakeshore hideaways for those wealthy enough to buy them.

  • Sample Letter to IRA Adminstrator DOC

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.