Dolores River Basin

The Dolores River Basin stretches from western Colorado to New Mexico and has many wildlands, such as the treasured San Juan Mountains.

The Wilderness Society is working to protect more than 60,000 acres of wild mountains and rivers and to keep energy development out of the wildest places in the area. 

Why the Dolores River Basin

The Dolores River Basin and the San Juan Mountains are some of the wildest places in the Rocky Mountain region. It has stunning scenery, important wildlife habitat and some of the best recreation in the west. 

Work we’re doing

We work to make sure that the wild parts of the Dolores River Basin stay wild. 

Partners

Protecting the Dolores River Basin isn’t something we can do alone. We work with a coalition of local groups and communities to protect this slice of the Rocky Mountains.

 

  • Anastasia Greene

    On Monday, September 26, the Colorado Bureau of Land Management state office announced that it will be pursuing a master leasing plan in Southwest Colorado. The statement comes after the agency engaged in an unprecedented public outreach campaign that consisted of a series of public meetings and the formation of a public working group that resulted in the submission of hundreds of comments to the local Tres Rios field office.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today the House of Representatives approved H.R. 845, the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act by Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Tim Walz (D-MN). The legislation would keep more trails across the nation open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteer and partner organizations and providing increased focus on a handful of priority areas around the country.

  • Michael Reinemer

    With very few legislative days left in the 114th Congress, this bill has no chance of being adopted and would do too little to protect wild, cultural and historic lands, including the critically important Bears Ears area.