Eastern Tennessee

Despite sharing a border with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, much of the wild forest in eastern Tennessee is still unprotected.

Eastern Tennessee a recreation destination. At Wilderness, we’re working to protect more of this magnificent forest so that visitors can continue to enjoy outstanding recreation and wildlife can continue to thrive.

Why Eastern Tennessee

The forests and wildlands in eastern Tennessee are among the wildest lands east of the Mississippi River. They provide recreation opportunities for millions of visitors each year and help support the local economies. They also help provide clean drinking water for local communities. Despite their incredible value, the eastern Tennessee forests are threatened by logging — and much of them remains unprotected.

Work We Are Doing

Our work in eastern Tennessee is focused on keeping the forests and wildlands of the region — like the Cherokee National Forest — as wild as they can be.

Our Partners

We can’t protect the forests of eastern Tennessee without help from local communities, businesses, decision makers and residents.

  • Michael Reinemer

    “The Wilderness Society applauds the actions by Senators Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall to introduce and guide the Cerros del Norte Conservation Act forward,“ said Michael Casaus, New Mexico Director with The Wilderness Society in Albuquerque. “Designating these two unique areas contained within the Río Grande del Norte National Monument as official wilderness ensures these wild and diverse landscapes that are so important to local communities receive the government’s highest level of protection.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society released the following statement regarding passage of Rep. Mike Simpson’s bill to protect the Boulder-White Cloud mountains out of the U.S. House of Representatives:

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society applauds progress toward reauthorization of the nation’s most important conservation program, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), a 50-year-old law that has invested in parks, trails, historic sites, and ball fields in virtually every county in the U.S.