Eastern Tennessee

Despite sharing a border with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, much of the wild forest in eastern Tennessee is still unprotected.

Eastern Tennessee a recreation destination. At Wilderness, we’re working to protect more of this magnificent forest so that visitors can continue to enjoy outstanding recreation and wildlife can continue to thrive.

Why Eastern Tennessee

The forests and wildlands in eastern Tennessee are among the wildest lands east of the Mississippi River. They provide recreation opportunities for millions of visitors each year and help support the local economies. They also help provide clean drinking water for local communities. Despite their incredible value, the eastern Tennessee forests are threatened by logging — and much of them remains unprotected.

Work We Are Doing

Our work in eastern Tennessee is focused on keeping the forests and wildlands of the region — like the Cherokee National Forest — as wild as they can be.

Our Partners

We can’t protect the forests of eastern Tennessee without help from local communities, businesses, decision makers and residents.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    According to the agency, this is the first time the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Farmington Field Office and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ (BIA) Navajo Regional Office will jointly conduct an analysis of management in the area that covers both public and tribal lands.  

    The following are statements in response to the announcement:

  • Anastasia Greene

    The We Can’t Wait report shows how outdated leasing guidelines, which cost taxpayers $62 million each year and create mounting environmental threats and cleanup costs, require immediate action. The report explores how modernizing the leasing program would safeguard the value of our public lands for generations to come.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The plan is part of the highly controversial Gasco Natural Gas Development Project, which the Bureau of Land Management approved in 2012. That decision initially approved nearly 1,300 new oil and gas wells in Utah’s greater Desolation Canyon region. This 16-well project was one of the first site-specific authorizations to follow.