Experience the Plateau

Every year, millions of visitors travel to the Colorado Plateau to experience geological attractions and outdoor adventures found nowhere else in the nation.

The Colorado Plateau stretches across vast portions of Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. Pick any of these states and you’ll find plenty to do in the Plateau.

You can hike through redrock canyons, paddle down lazy rivers, explore renowned archeological sites or visit some of the great western parks, including Grand Canyon, Arches and Canyonlands national parks.

Things to do

One could spend a lifetime exploring the Plateau and never run out of things to do. Visitors can paddle down the Yampa river, go mountain biking in Moab or explore natural wonders like the Grand Canyon or Vermillion Cliffs.

Where to go

The Colorado Plateau covers more than 100 million acres. We’ll help you narrow that down to the best places to go.

When to go

People visit the Colorado Plateau year-round. Learn the best times to go for the peak outdoor activities. 

  • Anastasia Greene

    “Secretary Jewell is on the right track. The plan to pursue cancellation of this oil and gas lease sets the stage for getting rid of the remaining leases in the Badger-Two Medicine region,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “This is not only an ecologically invaluable link between Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, it’s a sacred place for the Blackfeet Nation and a stronghold for the Blackfeet culture.

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