Experience the Plateau

Every year, millions of visitors travel to the Colorado Plateau to experience geological attractions and outdoor adventures found nowhere else in the nation.

The Colorado Plateau stretches across vast portions of Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. Pick any of these states and you’ll find plenty to do in the Plateau.

You can hike through redrock canyons, paddle down lazy rivers, explore renowned archeological sites or visit some of the great western parks, including Grand Canyon, Arches and Canyonlands national parks.

Things to do

One could spend a lifetime exploring the Plateau and never run out of things to do. Visitors can paddle down the Yampa river, go mountain biking in Moab or explore natural wonders like the Grand Canyon or Vermillion Cliffs.

Where to go

The Colorado Plateau covers more than 100 million acres. We’ll help you narrow that down to the best places to go.

When to go

People visit the Colorado Plateau year-round. Learn the best times to go for the peak outdoor activities. 

  • Max Greenberg

    The Wilderness Society is pleased to join California desert residents, local elected officials, tribal representatives and community leaders dedicating the newly designated Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow and Castle Mountains National Monuments. United States Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell; California Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird; Congressman Raul Ruiz (CA-36); Jody Noiron, Forest Supervisor, San Bernardino National Forest, U.S.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    During its history, the state of Idaho has sold off more than 1.7 million acres of land to private interests, according to an analysis of land sale data by The Wilderness Society released this week.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.