Experience the Plateau

Every year, millions of visitors travel to the Colorado Plateau to experience geological attractions and outdoor adventures found nowhere else in the nation.

The Colorado Plateau stretches across vast portions of Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. Pick any of these states and you’ll find plenty to do in the Plateau.

You can hike through redrock canyons, paddle down lazy rivers, explore renowned archeological sites or visit some of the great western parks, including Grand Canyon, Arches and Canyonlands national parks.

Things to do

One could spend a lifetime exploring the Plateau and never run out of things to do. Visitors can paddle down the Yampa river, go mountain biking in Moab or explore natural wonders like the Grand Canyon or Vermillion Cliffs.

Where to go

The Colorado Plateau covers more than 100 million acres. We’ll help you narrow that down to the best places to go.

When to go

People visit the Colorado Plateau year-round. Learn the best times to go for the peak outdoor activities. 

  • Anastasia Greene

    On Monday, September 26, the Colorado Bureau of Land Management state office announced that it will be pursuing a master leasing plan in Southwest Colorado. The statement comes after the agency engaged in an unprecedented public outreach campaign that consisted of a series of public meetings and the formation of a public working group that resulted in the submission of hundreds of comments to the local Tres Rios field office.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today the House of Representatives approved H.R. 845, the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act by Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Tim Walz (D-MN). The legislation would keep more trails across the nation open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteer and partner organizations and providing increased focus on a handful of priority areas around the country.

  • Michael Reinemer

    With very few legislative days left in the 114th Congress, this bill has no chance of being adopted and would do too little to protect wild, cultural and historic lands, including the critically important Bears Ears area.