Experience the Southern Appalachians

Well within a day’s drive for millions of Americans, the Southern Appalachians region is an magnet for wilderness lovers and outdoor recreationists.

Paddlers can rip through the rapids on the Nantahala River. Hikers and equestrians can get out into more than a dozen designated wilderness areas. Mountain bikers can ride some of the best trails in the east in the legendary Pisgah National Forest.

Things to do

Like a walk through wildflower jungles? Or fly fishing in a crystal clear mountain stream? There are a wealth of outdoor opportunities in the Southern Appalachians region.

Where to go

With so many options for outdoor adventure, it can be hard to choose where to go. We have a few forests in mind for your next adventure in the Southern Appalachians region.

When to go

Whether you're chasing fall foliage, hunting for spring wildflowers or seeking out a cool forest to avoid the heat of summer, we've got tips on when to visit the Southern Appalachians region.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.