Forest Planning

America’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands are the backbone of our public land system. They provide clean air and water and a place to camp and hike.

National forests also sustain local communities with drinking water, sustainable jobs and endless recreation opportunities. The U.S. Forest Service manages each national forest according to the direction laid out in its land management plan. Land management plans are revised every 10 to 15 years, and must follow a specific framework established in an overarching Forest Planning Rule. 

What is forest planning?

Land management plans identify and protect lands and waters with special features in our national forests. These can include wild and remote places, important habitats, unique recreational areas and remarkable botanical, ecological or geological values.

Forest plan revisions

In the history of the Forest Service, there has only been one successful forest planning rule and it dates back to 1982. The Obama administration recently revised the forest planning rule and is gearing up to revise a number of land management plans.

See also:

Statement on Forest Planning Rule

Helpful links

 

  • In the first of a three management plans to be released in 2015, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Colorado missed a great opportunity to protect some of Colorado's most treasured landscapes—including the Dolores River, lands surrounding Mesa Verde National Park and recreation hub

  • When school was out for the summer in the suburbs of Manhattan where I grew up, my mom packed our little Subaru hatchback with sleeping bags, a tent, a cooler filled with fruit and sandwich meat, hiking boots, rain gear, and three kids, and headed West.  Like generations before and since, w

  • The Forest Service recently released a plan that could protect much of Colorado’s Thompson Divide from new oil and gas leasing. For years, this spectacular area has been threatened by oil and gas development.