Forest Planning

America’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands are the backbone of our public land system. They provide clean air and water and a place to camp and hike.

National forests also sustain local communities with drinking water, sustainable jobs and endless recreation opportunities. The U.S. Forest Service manages each national forest according to the direction laid out in its land management plan. Land management plans are revised every 10 to 15 years, and must follow a specific framework established in an overarching Forest Planning Rule. 

What is forest planning?

Land management plans identify and protect lands and waters with special features in our national forests. These can include wild and remote places, important habitats, unique recreational areas and remarkable botanical, ecological or geological values.

Forest plan revisions

In the history of the Forest Service, there has only been one successful forest planning rule and it dates back to 1982. The Obama administration recently revised the forest planning rule and is gearing up to revise a number of land management plans.

See also:

Statement on Forest Planning Rule

Helpful links

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.