Forest Planning

America’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands are the backbone of our public land system. They provide clean air and water and a place to camp and hike.

National forests also sustain local communities with drinking water, sustainable jobs and endless recreation opportunities. The U.S. Forest Service manages each national forest according to the direction laid out in its land management plan. Land management plans are revised every 10 to 15 years, and must follow a specific framework established in an overarching Forest Planning Rule. 

What is forest planning?

Land management plans identify and protect lands and waters with special features in our national forests. These can include wild and remote places, important habitats, unique recreational areas and remarkable botanical, ecological or geological values.

Forest plan revisions

In the history of the Forest Service, there has only been one successful forest planning rule and it dates back to 1982. The Obama administration recently revised the forest planning rule and is gearing up to revise a number of land management plans.

See also:

Statement on Forest Planning Rule

Helpful links

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    As the Obama Administration draws to a close, we recognize President Obama's accomplishments in land conservation, energy reforms, efforts to help more Americans visit our great outdoors and honoring America’s diverse culture and history.

  • Anastasia Greene

    Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Representative Ryan Zinke appeared before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to answer questions at his confirmation hearing to serve as Secretary of the Interior.

    The Wilderness Society president, Jamie Williams issued the following statement:

    “It was heartening to see Ryan Zinke voice his strong support for our parks and other public lands, but at the same time he questioned settled science around climate change and called for the rollback of the BLM's new rule to curb natural gas waste.

  • Anastasia Greene

    After a ten-year environmental review with record public involvement, today the Forest Service issued its final decision to not lease 40,000 acres of sprawling wild lands in Wyoming’s Bridger-Teton National Forest.