Forest Planning

America’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands are the backbone of our public land system. They provide clean air and water and a place to camp and hike.

National forests also sustain local communities with drinking water, sustainable jobs and endless recreation opportunities. The U.S. Forest Service manages each national forest according to the direction laid out in its land management plan. Land management plans are revised every 10 to 15 years, and must follow a specific framework established in an overarching Forest Planning Rule. 

What is forest planning?

Land management plans identify and protect lands and waters with special features in our national forests. These can include wild and remote places, important habitats, unique recreational areas and remarkable botanical, ecological or geological values.

Forest plan revisions

In the history of the Forest Service, there has only been one successful forest planning rule and it dates back to 1982. The Obama administration recently revised the forest planning rule and is gearing up to revise a number of land management plans.

See also:

Statement on Forest Planning Rule

Helpful links

 

  • DJ Tyson

    Today, a coalition of conservation groups and others announced that a historic number of comments and petitions of support have been submitted to the Department of the Interior in support of Bears Ears National Monument.  Despite the entirely inadequate 15-day period ending on May 26th provided for comments, more than 685,000 comments in support of Bears Ears National Monument have been collected.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society can provide background, commentary and photos on the Trump administration review of Bears Ears and other national monuments across the country. Our experts can also offer regional insights and historical context regarding the use of the Antiquities Act to protect America’s natural, cultural and scientific treasures. 

    Please feel free to download and use any of the following digital resources in your coverage with appropriate credit.

  • Michael Reinemer

    At a time when America’s parks and other public lands desperately need greater investments and protections, the proposed Trump budget represents a retreat from common sense. Thoughtless cuts proposed for federal land agencies fly in the face of the public’s love for shared national lands and waters.