Forest Planning

America’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands are the backbone of our public land system. They provide clean air and water and a place to camp and hike.

National forests also sustain local communities with drinking water, sustainable jobs and endless recreation opportunities. The U.S. Forest Service manages each national forest according to the direction laid out in its land management plan. Land management plans are revised every 10 to 15 years, and must follow a specific framework established in an overarching Forest Planning Rule. 

What is forest planning?

Land management plans identify and protect lands and waters with special features in our national forests. These can include wild and remote places, important habitats, unique recreational areas and remarkable botanical, ecological or geological values.

Forest plan revisions

In the history of the Forest Service, there has only been one successful forest planning rule and it dates back to 1982. The Obama administration recently revised the forest planning rule and is gearing up to revise a number of land management plans.

See also:

Statement on Forest Planning Rule

Helpful links

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    “The Wilderness Society applauds the actions by Senators Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall to introduce and guide the Cerros del Norte Conservation Act forward,“ said Michael Casaus, New Mexico Director with The Wilderness Society in Albuquerque. “Designating these two unique areas contained within the Río Grande del Norte National Monument as official wilderness ensures these wild and diverse landscapes that are so important to local communities receive the government’s highest level of protection.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    This bill protects a wild area of Idaho called Boulder-White Clouds.  The House of Representatives passed an identical bill so all that’s left to enact the legislation into law is President Obama’s signature.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society released the following statement regarding passage of Rep. Mike Simpson’s bill to protect the Boulder-White Cloud mountains out of the U.S. House of Representatives: