Forest Planning

America’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands are the backbone of our public land system. They provide clean air and water and a place to camp and hike.

National forests also sustain local communities with drinking water, sustainable jobs and endless recreation opportunities. The U.S. Forest Service manages each national forest according to the direction laid out in its land management plan. Land management plans are revised every 10 to 15 years, and must follow a specific framework established in an overarching Forest Planning Rule. 

What is forest planning?

Land management plans identify and protect lands and waters with special features in our national forests. These can include wild and remote places, important habitats, unique recreational areas and remarkable botanical, ecological or geological values.

Forest plan revisions

In the history of the Forest Service, there has only been one successful forest planning rule and it dates back to 1982. The Obama administration recently revised the forest planning rule and is gearing up to revise a number of land management plans.

See also:

Statement on Forest Planning Rule

Helpful links

 

  • Testimony delivered by The Wilderness Society's Chase Huntley to the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

  • A letter to Members of the House of Representatives urging them to oppose HR 4899, a bill that would undermine important wildland protections and force drilling in pristine areas of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts.