Forest Protection

Our forests provide drinking water for 60 million people. The relationship between land and water is clear: what you do to the land, you do to the water.

The Wilderness Society works with people to protect our national forests. From local communities to members of Congress, from timber workers to folks in the White House, we are working to save our forests.  

Local communities depend on forests and forests depend on the communities that surround them. Federal forest policies need to work for the people as well as the land.

Pending forest bills

One of the ways in which we protect our forests is through legislation in Congress. By working with lawmakers, we can find solutions that protect our forests and the livelihoods of the people who depend on forests for jobs.

Currently, we are working on passing three important bills:

  • Secure Rural Schools Act
    This bill provides funding for school improvement programs and stewardship projects in our national forests.
  • Roadless Area Conservation Act
    This bill would make the landmark “Roadless Rule” an act of Congress.
  • Forest Service Appropriations Act
    This bill would determine how well maintained trails and campgrounds are and whether the Forest Service can buy any new national forest land.

Roads, vehicles and access

Did you know there are about 380,000 miles of roads in our national forests? That’s enough to travel around the earth at the equator 15 times. Left over from a bygone era of poor logging practices, many of these roads are no longer in use and have fallen into disrepair, leading to serious problems in our forests.

Our work to address the road problem includes:

  • Right-sizing an outdated road system in our national forests
  • Managing off-road vehicles

Conserving roadless areas

Roadless national forest lands are some of the most pristine in America. They were not affected by the timber boom in the 1950s to 1980s, and have not been destroyed by mining or other reckless development. The Wilderness Society is working to conserve roadless areas across the United States.

Thanks to the Roadless Rule, 50 million acres of national forest roadless areas are protected from new roads and logging. After powerful industries tried to fight them in the courts, this rule is now the law of the land.

Colorado and Idaho have proposed their own roadless rules that pertain only to areas in the state. This means that local communities and The Wilderness Society are constantly advocating for the protection of the many thousands of acres of roadless forests left unprotected in these two states.

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.