Forest Restoration

For more than 100 years, America’s national forests have been exploited for timber and energy development, among other things.

We often talk about restoring America’s man-made infrastructures, like bridges, highways and tunnels. But what about our natural infrastructure, such as our polluted water and unhealthy forests? Today, America’s forests are blighted with water pollution, mudslides, invasion of non-native species, loss of wildlife habitat, wildfires and degraded recreational opportunities. 

The Wilderness Society’s restoration program is working with local communities and in government to restore our national forests back to their original splendor.

Forest service and restoration

The Wilderness Society - along with local communities and partners on the ground - is working with the U.S. Forest Service to restore our national forests.

Integrated Resource Restoration budget

The U.S. Forest Service’s Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR) budget is a way to make forest restoration work efficiently and effectively. This critical program was included in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2013 (FY 2013) budget. The Wilderness Society will be working with the Forest Service and monitoring the progress of the program.

Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program

The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) encourages collaborative and science based ecosystem restoration of priority national forest landscapes while benefitting local communities.

Watershed restoration

Did you know that only half of the watersheds in our national forests are classified as functioning properly? Yet these are the areas that are supposed to provide us with clean drinking water and healthy fisheries. By restoring our watersheds, we can clean up America’s water. 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today, Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society, issued the following statement on the expected nomination of U.S. Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers for Secretary of the Interior.
     
    “Across the political spectrum, Americans deeply cherish our shared public lands and want to see them protected for future generations. Turning the keys to our nation’s public lands over to someone who has called for drilling and development in pristine landscapes is not what most Americans want. 

  • Caroline Mosley

    Unfortunately, she has voted for measures that would prevent taxpayers from receiving a fair price for resources mined on public lands, prioritized drilling public lands over recreational uses, and allowed companies to bypass certain Clean Air Act provisions for offshore drilling. It’s not all bad news, she has supported renewable energy and cosponsored legislation to promote responsible siting of wind and solar on public lands, but the balance sheet isn’t good. Here’s a sampling of the rest of her record.

  • Tyler North

    Today, the Senate took its final steps to secure the National Defense Authorization Act – without the presence of a provision that would have undermined collaborative plans to conserve the sagebrush ecosystem and hampered the sage-grouse’s chances at survival.