Forest Restoration

For more than 100 years, America’s national forests have been exploited for timber and energy development, among other things.

We often talk about restoring America’s man-made infrastructures, like bridges, highways and tunnels. But what about our natural infrastructure, such as our polluted water and unhealthy forests? Today, America’s forests are blighted with water pollution, mudslides, invasion of non-native species, loss of wildlife habitat, wildfires and degraded recreational opportunities. 

The Wilderness Society’s restoration program is working with local communities and in government to restore our national forests back to their original splendor.

Forest service and restoration

The Wilderness Society - along with local communities and partners on the ground - is working with the U.S. Forest Service to restore our national forests.

Integrated Resource Restoration budget

The U.S. Forest Service’s Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR) budget is a way to make forest restoration work efficiently and effectively. This critical program was included in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2013 (FY 2013) budget. The Wilderness Society will be working with the Forest Service and monitoring the progress of the program.

Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program

The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) encourages collaborative and science based ecosystem restoration of priority national forest landscapes while benefitting local communities.

Watershed restoration

Did you know that only half of the watersheds in our national forests are classified as functioning properly? Yet these are the areas that are supposed to provide us with clean drinking water and healthy fisheries. By restoring our watersheds, we can clean up America’s water. 

  • Anastasia Greene

    Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Representative Ryan Zinke appeared before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to answer questions at his confirmation hearing to serve as Secretary of the Interior.

    The Wilderness Society president, Jamie Williams issued the following statement:

    “It was heartening to see Ryan Zinke voice his strong support for our parks and other public lands, but at the same time he questioned settled science around climate change and called for the rollback of the BLM's new rule to curb natural gas waste.

  • Anastasia Greene

    After a ten-year environmental review with record public involvement, today the Forest Service issued its final decision to not lease 40,000 acres of sprawling wild lands in Wyoming’s Bridger-Teton National Forest.

  • Anastasia Greene

    SUWA, The Wilderness Society, Earthjustice, and a coalition of eight other conservation groups, along with the Bureau of Land Management and off-highway vehicle groups have taken an important step to settle longstanding litigation filed in 2008 by the conservation groups which challenged six land use plans and off-highway vehicle travel plans completed at the end of the George W.