Forest Restoration

For more than 100 years, America’s national forests have been exploited for timber and energy development, among other things.

We often talk about restoring America’s man-made infrastructures, like bridges, highways and tunnels. But what about our natural infrastructure, such as our polluted water and unhealthy forests? Today, America’s forests are blighted with water pollution, mudslides, invasion of non-native species, loss of wildlife habitat, wildfires and degraded recreational opportunities. 

The Wilderness Society’s restoration program is working with local communities and in government to restore our national forests back to their original splendor.

Forest service and restoration

The Wilderness Society - along with local communities and partners on the ground - is working with the U.S. Forest Service to restore our national forests.

Integrated Resource Restoration budget

The U.S. Forest Service’s Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR) budget is a way to make forest restoration work efficiently and effectively. This critical program was included in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2013 (FY 2013) budget. The Wilderness Society will be working with the Forest Service and monitoring the progress of the program.

Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program

The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) encourages collaborative and science based ecosystem restoration of priority national forest landscapes while benefitting local communities.

Watershed restoration

Did you know that only half of the watersheds in our national forests are classified as functioning properly? Yet these are the areas that are supposed to provide us with clean drinking water and healthy fisheries. By restoring our watersheds, we can clean up America’s water. 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society strongly supports bipartisan legislation, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 (S. 235, H.R. 167), to fix a budgetary problem called “fire borrowing.”  This is a destructive cycle in which the Forest Service is forced to take funds from other forest programs when its allotted wildfire funds are used up, essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul to put out fires in our national forests.