Forest Restoration

For more than 100 years, America’s national forests have been exploited for timber and energy development, among other things.

We often talk about restoring America’s man-made infrastructures, like bridges, highways and tunnels. But what about our natural infrastructure, such as our polluted water and unhealthy forests? Today, America’s forests are blighted with water pollution, mudslides, invasion of non-native species, loss of wildlife habitat, wildfires and degraded recreational opportunities. 

The Wilderness Society’s restoration program is working with local communities and in government to restore our national forests back to their original splendor.

Forest service and restoration

The Wilderness Society - along with local communities and partners on the ground - is working with the U.S. Forest Service to restore our national forests.

Integrated Resource Restoration budget

The U.S. Forest Service’s Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR) budget is a way to make forest restoration work efficiently and effectively. This critical program was included in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2013 (FY 2013) budget. The Wilderness Society will be working with the Forest Service and monitoring the progress of the program.

Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program

The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) encourages collaborative and science based ecosystem restoration of priority national forest landscapes while benefitting local communities.

Watershed restoration

Did you know that only half of the watersheds in our national forests are classified as functioning properly? Yet these are the areas that are supposed to provide us with clean drinking water and healthy fisheries. By restoring our watersheds, we can clean up America’s water. 

  • The 115th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.