Gallatin Range

The Gallatin Range is a wildlife corridor between the Crown of the Continent and Yellowstone National Park. It provides clean water for nearby towns, a refuge for wildlife and world-class recreation.

The Gallatin Range is a wildlife corridor between the Crown of the Continent and Yellowstone National Park. It provides clean water for nearby towns, a refuge for wildlife and world-class recreation.

But overuse could harm all of these values. The Wilderness Society is working to both protect its wild places and ensure there are recreation opportunities.

Why the Gallatin Range

The Gallatin is the last and largest wild mountain tract bordering Yellowstone Park that is not permanently protected.

Work we’re doing

A long-term vision for the Gallatin Range will permanently protect its core while improving recreational opportunities in the forest that surrounds it.

Our partners

We’re working with diverse groups to create a proposal for the Gallatin that marries wilderness protection and recreational opportunity.

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are disappointed to see that the President-elect has appointed a climate science skeptic who has pledged to rollback greenhouse gas reduction measures. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges from human-caused climate change, including our national parks and communities most vulnerable to drought, flooding and other effects.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As leaders of the U.S. environmental movement, we are mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, white, black, Latino, Asian, Native American, of many creeds, faiths and religions. We come from diverse backgrounds and near infinite preferences and beliefs. But above all, we are concerned individuals and concerned members of the human race.

  • Michael Reinemer
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.