Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming is cherished for its stunning landscapes. Known as a place where dinosaurs once roamed, this area still has abundant wildlife.

While some parts of the region like Dinosaur National Monument are already protected, many more areas are still at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to preserve some of the wildest parts of this unique landscape.

Why the Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region is an area with a wealth of natural beauty. These wild landscapes – and the bones of the dinosaurs that the area is named for – are an economic driver for local communities.  Protecting the wild areas of the region is important for the people and the wildlife that live here.

Work we’re doing

We’re working with our partners to protect some of the wildest areas in the Greater Dinosaur region, including:

  • Red desert cliffs of Wyoming’s Adobe Town.
  • Multicolored badlands of Colorado’s Vermillion Basin.
  • Proposed wilderness lands surrounding Dinosaur National Monument in both Colorado and Utah.

Our partners

We couldn’t accomplish our conservation goals in the Greater Dinosaur Region alone. We partner with many local groups and some national groups and federal agencies to keep the Greater Dinosaur Region protected.
 

  • Wildflowers are enticing treasures for wilderness lovers each year. They come in countless varieties and yet can be so fleeting. They sprinkle wild landscapes with color and send subtle fragrances into the nearby air.

  • A new multi-state plan for the greater sage-grouse could include conservation measures to protect more than 50 million acres of Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land that provides critical habitat for the species. Secretary Sally Jewell announced the plan on May 28 in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

  • Infographic: The Land and Water Conservation Fund

    The Land and Water Conservation Fund, which was signed into law in 1964, is a visionary idea that has helped protect millions of acres of land.