Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming is cherished for its stunning landscapes. Known as a place where dinosaurs once roamed, this area still has abundant wildlife.

While some parts of the region like Dinosaur National Monument are already protected, many more areas are still at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to preserve some of the wildest parts of this unique landscape.

Why the Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region is an area with a wealth of natural beauty. These wild landscapes – and the bones of the dinosaurs that the area is named for – are an economic driver for local communities.  Protecting the wild areas of the region is important for the people and the wildlife that live here.

Work we’re doing

We’re working with our partners to protect some of the wildest areas in the Greater Dinosaur region, including:

  • Red desert cliffs of Wyoming’s Adobe Town.
  • Multicolored badlands of Colorado’s Vermillion Basin.
  • Proposed wilderness lands surrounding Dinosaur National Monument in both Colorado and Utah.

Our partners

We couldn’t accomplish our conservation goals in the Greater Dinosaur Region alone. We partner with many local groups and some national groups and federal agencies to keep the Greater Dinosaur Region protected.
 

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.