Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming is cherished for its stunning landscapes. Known as a place where dinosaurs once roamed, this area still has abundant wildlife.

While some parts of the region like Dinosaur National Monument are already protected, many more areas are still at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to preserve some of the wildest parts of this unique landscape.

Why the Greater Dinosaur Region

The Greater Dinosaur Region is an area with a wealth of natural beauty. These wild landscapes – and the bones of the dinosaurs that the area is named for – are an economic driver for local communities.  Protecting the wild areas of the region is important for the people and the wildlife that live here.

Work we’re doing

We’re working with our partners to protect some of the wildest areas in the Greater Dinosaur region, including:

  • Red desert cliffs of Wyoming’s Adobe Town.
  • Multicolored badlands of Colorado’s Vermillion Basin.
  • Proposed wilderness lands surrounding Dinosaur National Monument in both Colorado and Utah.

Our partners

We couldn’t accomplish our conservation goals in the Greater Dinosaur Region alone. We partner with many local groups and some national groups and federal agencies to keep the Greater Dinosaur Region protected.
 

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.

  • “We Can’t Wait: Why we need reform of the federal coal program now,” shows how the industry has been passing on millions in costs every day to the public. The status quo of the program has impacted public lands to the tune of billions of dollars and could multiply if coal companies aren’t held responsible for cleanup as they go bankrupt. Damages due to climate change from mining emissions will cost billions and drinking water for entire cities could be lost to mining or polluted beyond safe drinking levels.