Greater Yellowstone Focus Areas

Greater Yellowstone is an iconic remnant of the American wildlands that once stretched from coast to coast. It is a window to our wild heritage and a wildland in great need of protection.

Greater Yellowstone is one of the last remaining intact wildlands in the United States and the world. At Wilderness, we're working to keep it protected for many years to come by fending off over-development and other threats.

Wyoming Range

Our work in the Wyoming Range protects the clean air and water, critical wildlife habitat and year-round recreation activities that these wild lands offer.

Shoshone National Forest

The Shoshone is the nation’s first national forest and one of the least developed. Preventing drilling and new roads will preserve its unique wild character.

Gallatin Range

The Gallatin Range provides clean water for nearby towns, a refuge for wildlife and world-class hunting, fishing and recreation. We work to ensure that it isn’t ‘loved to death.’

  • Michael Reinemer
    The Wilderness Society today praised Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) for introducing important legislation that would conserve more than 58,000 acres of public lands in Colorado’s Eagle and Summit Counties including approximately 40,000 acres of wilderness and more than 18,000 acres as special management areas.  
     
  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate.