Greater Yellowstone

There are so few large, nearly intact networks of wildlands left on earth. Greater Yellowstone is one of the last.

Greater Yellowstone is defined by blue-ribbon trout streams, grizzly bears and the longest wildlife migration corridor in the continental United States. But these treasures are now threatened by expanding energy development pressures and growing populations.

At Wilderness, we're working to protect this iconic American wildland from these threats and preserve the landscape's natural and human benefits.

Stories from Greater Yellowstone

Greater Yellowstone is one of the most recognized wildlands in America, but it is best discovered through the eyes of local residents whose lives are rooted in the land.

Greater Yellowstone focus areas

At Wilderness, our work within Greater Yellowstone is rooted in several focal wildlands that need protection.

Help protect Greater Yellowstone

You can help protect Greater Yellowstone so that it remains as iconic and wild as it is today.

  • Testimony delivered by The Wilderness Society's Chase Huntley to the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

  • A letter to Members of the House of Representatives urging them to oppose HR 4899, a bill that would undermine important wildland protections and force drilling in pristine areas of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts.