Greater Yellowstone

There are so few large, nearly intact networks of wildlands left on earth. Greater Yellowstone is one of the last.

Greater Yellowstone is defined by blue-ribbon trout streams, grizzly bears and the longest wildlife migration corridor in the continental United States. But these treasures are now threatened by expanding energy development pressures and growing populations.

At Wilderness, we're working to protect this iconic American wildland from these threats and preserve the landscape's natural and human benefits.

Stories from Greater Yellowstone

Greater Yellowstone is one of the most recognized wildlands in America, but it is best discovered through the eyes of local residents whose lives are rooted in the land.

Greater Yellowstone focus areas

At Wilderness, our work within Greater Yellowstone is rooted in several focal wildlands that need protection.

Help protect Greater Yellowstone

You can help protect Greater Yellowstone so that it remains as iconic and wild as it is today.

  • Comments from The Wilderness Society, Natural Resources Defense Council, and others submitted to the Bureau of Land Management regarding proposed rules for leasing land for wind and solar energy projects on federal lands. 

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • The Wilderness Society submitted official comments on the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation plan that was proposed early in the fall of 2014. The comment period allowed for broad public participation in determining the future of balancing conservation and recreation with renewable energy development.

    The following is an excerpt from our comments submitted on February 22, 2015. The full comment document is available for download.