Help Protect New Mexico

There is much work to be done to make sure New Mexico wildlands are protected for generations to come. You can help us protect wilderness and wildlife in New Mexico.

The history of New Mexico is written on the land - in the remnants of cindercones from its volcanic past, fossils left from receding oceans and the petroglyphs carved in the rocks by indigenous ancestors. Today some of the wildest country left in the Rocky Mountain West can be found in New Mexico, yet the state holds the smallest percentage of lands protected as federally designated wilderness of any western state.

We are working to change that so that New Mexico’s landscapes, watersheds and wildlife habitat are less vulnerable to mineral exploitation, oil and gas development, abusive off-road vehicle use and climate change.

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting New Mexico and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect New Mexico.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.