Help Protect New Mexico

There is much work to be done to make sure New Mexico wildlands are protected for generations to come. You can help us protect wilderness and wildlife in New Mexico.

The history of New Mexico is written on the land - in the remnants of cindercones from its volcanic past, fossils left from receding oceans and the petroglyphs carved in the rocks by indigenous ancestors. Today some of the wildest country left in the Rocky Mountain West can be found in New Mexico, yet the state holds the smallest percentage of lands protected as federally designated wilderness of any western state.

We are working to change that so that New Mexico’s landscapes, watersheds and wildlife habitat are less vulnerable to mineral exploitation, oil and gas development, abusive off-road vehicle use and climate change.

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting New Mexico and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect New Mexico.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.