Help Protect New Mexico

There is much work to be done to make sure New Mexico wildlands are protected for generations to come. You can help us protect wilderness and wildlife in New Mexico.

The history of New Mexico is written on the land - in the remnants of cindercones from its volcanic past, fossils left from receding oceans and the petroglyphs carved in the rocks by indigenous ancestors. Today some of the wildest country left in the Rocky Mountain West can be found in New Mexico, yet the state holds the smallest percentage of lands protected as federally designated wilderness of any western state.

We are working to change that so that New Mexico’s landscapes, watersheds and wildlife habitat are less vulnerable to mineral exploitation, oil and gas development, abusive off-road vehicle use and climate change.

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting New Mexico and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect New Mexico.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Tim Woody

    President Barack Obama is expected to visit Anchorage, Alaska on Monday, where according to the White House he will address the State Department's GLACIER conference focused on a conversation around the Arctic and climate change. His visit to communities nearby will allow him to see first-hand the impacts that Native villagers and Alaskan communities are facing on a daily basis.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senator Cantwell, the ranking member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, has scheduled a hearing in Seattle on August 27 to examine wildfire issues.  Senator John Barrasso, who chairs that committee’s Public Lands, Forests and Mining subcommittee, is also scheduled to participate in the hearing.

  • Tim Woody

    When President Obama visits Alaska at the end of August, climate change will be a key focus of his trip. The Wilderness Society developed the following memo to provide a brief primer on key Alaska public lands where the effects of climate change can already be seen. This information is intended to ease your research and inform your reporting during the president’s visit. It focuses on four areas where the president’s administration has made major, important decisions: