Help Protect New Mexico

There is much work to be done to make sure New Mexico wildlands are protected for generations to come. You can help us protect wilderness and wildlife in New Mexico.

The history of New Mexico is written on the land - in the remnants of cindercones from its volcanic past, fossils left from receding oceans and the petroglyphs carved in the rocks by indigenous ancestors. Today some of the wildest country left in the Rocky Mountain West can be found in New Mexico, yet the state holds the smallest percentage of lands protected as federally designated wilderness of any western state.

We are working to change that so that New Mexico’s landscapes, watersheds and wildlife habitat are less vulnerable to mineral exploitation, oil and gas development, abusive off-road vehicle use and climate change.

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting New Mexico and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect New Mexico.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • For this report, The Wilderness Society reviewed data from more than 16,000 parcels auctioned off by the state. The analysis details more than a century of land sales that have privatized and closed off an amount of once-accessible lands nearly the size of the entire Sawtooth National Forest. Parcels often end up in the hands of some of Idaho’s biggest industries, while others have been turned into gravel pits, strip malls and even exclusive private fishing retreats and lakeshore hideaways for those wealthy enough to buy them.

  • Sample Letter to IRA Adminstrator DOC

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.