Help Protect the Southern Appalachians

The Southern Appalachians region stretches across the peaks and valleys of western North Carolina and east Tennessee.

The Southern Appalachians region is known for its breathtaking scenery, abundant wildlife and world-class camping, hiking and fishing. Nestled in the southern Appalachian Mountains, these biodiverse forests are among America’s greatest natural treasures. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest ranks fourth in the nation for development threats around its perimeter.

Our work helps protect thousands of acres of forests, mountains and waterways in the Southern Appalachians region, not to mention the elk, bears, birds, salamanders and other wildlife that depend on them. But we don’t accomplish this alone. Your support makes all the difference in protecting this wild landscape. 

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting the Southern Appalachians and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect the Southern Appalachians.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Kate Mackay

    Today the House Natural Resources Committee marked up and passed H.R. 2936, the “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” which opens America’s national forests and roadless areas to expedited logging—a direct attack on the nation’s last old growth stands, clean drinking water for millions and quiet habitat for wildlife.

  • Tim Woody

    Alaska Gov. Bill Walker today announced that the U.S. Department of the Interior has granted the state permission to survey a potential road route through a designated wilderness area in Izembek National Wildlife Refuge for a boondoggle road project that would cost American taxpayers more than $80 million. In response, The Wilderness Society issues the following statement from its Alaska Regional Director, Nicole Whittington-Evans:

     

  • Tim Woody

    On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline,  The Wilderness Society today released a report that debunks one of the primary arguments allies of the oil industry have put forward to promote drilling in one of America’s last pristine, untouched landscapes: Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.