Help Protect the Southern Appalachians

The Southern Appalachians region stretches across the peaks and valleys of western North Carolina and east Tennessee.

The Southern Appalachians region is known for its breathtaking scenery, abundant wildlife and world-class camping, hiking and fishing. Nestled in the southern Appalachian Mountains, these biodiverse forests are among America’s greatest natural treasures. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest ranks fourth in the nation for development threats around its perimeter.

Our work helps protect thousands of acres of forests, mountains and waterways in the Southern Appalachians region, not to mention the elk, bears, birds, salamanders and other wildlife that depend on them. But we don’t accomplish this alone. Your support makes all the difference in protecting this wild landscape. 

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting the Southern Appalachians and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect the Southern Appalachians.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.