Help Protect the Southern Appalachians

The Southern Appalachians region stretches across the peaks and valleys of western North Carolina and east Tennessee.

The Southern Appalachians region is known for its breathtaking scenery, abundant wildlife and world-class camping, hiking and fishing. Nestled in the southern Appalachian Mountains, these biodiverse forests are among America’s greatest natural treasures. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest ranks fourth in the nation for development threats around its perimeter.

Our work helps protect thousands of acres of forests, mountains and waterways in the Southern Appalachians region, not to mention the elk, bears, birds, salamanders and other wildlife that depend on them. But we don’t accomplish this alone. Your support makes all the difference in protecting this wild landscape. 

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting the Southern Appalachians and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect the Southern Appalachians.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As the Obama Administration draws to a close, we recognize President Obama's accomplishments in land conservation, energy reforms, efforts to help more Americans visit our great outdoors and honoring America’s diverse culture and history.

  • Anastasia Greene

    Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Representative Ryan Zinke appeared before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to answer questions at his confirmation hearing to serve as Secretary of the Interior.

    The Wilderness Society president, Jamie Williams issued the following statement:

    “It was heartening to see Ryan Zinke voice his strong support for our parks and other public lands, but at the same time he questioned settled science around climate change and called for the rollback of the BLM's new rule to curb natural gas waste.

  • Anastasia Greene

    After a ten-year environmental review with record public involvement, today the Forest Service issued its final decision to not lease 40,000 acres of sprawling wild lands in Wyoming’s Bridger-Teton National Forest.