Help Protect the Southern Appalachians

The Southern Appalachians region stretches across the peaks and valleys of western North Carolina and east Tennessee.

The Southern Appalachians region is known for its breathtaking scenery, abundant wildlife and world-class camping, hiking and fishing. Nestled in the southern Appalachian Mountains, these biodiverse forests are among America’s greatest natural treasures. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest ranks fourth in the nation for development threats around its perimeter.

Our work helps protect thousands of acres of forests, mountains and waterways in the Southern Appalachians region, not to mention the elk, bears, birds, salamanders and other wildlife that depend on them. But we don’t accomplish this alone. Your support makes all the difference in protecting this wild landscape. 

If you love this landscape and want to work to protect it, please:

Become a member

When you donate $35 or more, you become a member of The Wilderness Society and join our network of supporters dedicated to protecting the Southern Appalachians and other wild places.

Make a donation

Even a small donation can help us continue our work to protect the Southern Appalachians.

Stay connected

Join our growing online community of people working to protect our cherished wild places.

Take action

Many issues that affect one wildland also affect other wild places across the country. Learn about current issues and lend your voice to important causes.

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.