High Peaks of Western Maine

Stretching over 230,000 acres in western Maine, the High Peaks are one of the most spectacular wild places in the eastern United States.

This area is home to old-growth forests as well as growing populations of bobcats and lynx. The Wilderness Society is working with partners to protect these lands.

Why Western Maine?

Encompassing one of the largest undeveloped areas in the eastern U.S., the High Peaks are home to important forests.  These forests are like a living laboratory for studying climate change.

What we’re doing

We’re working with local groups and land trusts to protect and conserve lands in the High Peaks area. In addition, we’re researching how wildlife and wild places can adapt to climate change.

Our partners

We work with the Maine Appalachian Trail Land Trust in the High Peaks area.

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.
  • Chart of offshore oil well blowout incident rates illustrates the need for stronger federal regulations to improve human safety and decrease environmental risk.

  • This fourth in a series of Easy to Start, Impossible to Finish reports analyzes four major transportation and energy projects in the planning stages in the state of Alaska. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker stopped discretionary spending on these four projects–the proposed Ambler Road in the Arctic Interior, Juneau Access, the Knik Arm Bridge and the Susitna-Watana Dam–soon after he took office in 2014. During 2015, Gov. Walker reversed course and allowed these projects to continue spending money on studies.