Highway 2

Breathtaking to explore and crucial to the health of the larger North Cascades landscape, Highway 2 is an important wildland to protect.

The Wilderness Society’s work along the Highway Two corridor aims to meet the recreational needs of the region and demonstrate the benefit of wilderness to local communities. We are committed to improving access to lands and ecological health of watersheds.

Why Highway Two

The wilderness areas in the Highway Two corridor are not only important for their natural resource values, but for the outstanding recreation opportunities they offer.

Work we’re doing

We're working in the Highway Two corridor on projects focused on recreational access and watershed restoration.

Our partners

Our diverse partnerships are crucial to the success of our Highway Two work.

See also:

Methow Valley

Yakima Basin

  • Jennifer Dickson

    According to the agency, this is the first time the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Farmington Field Office and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ (BIA) Navajo Regional Office will jointly conduct an analysis of management in the area that covers both public and tribal lands.  

    The following are statements in response to the announcement:

  • Anastasia Greene

    The We Can’t Wait report shows how outdated leasing guidelines, which cost taxpayers $62 million each year and create mounting environmental threats and cleanup costs, require immediate action. The report explores how modernizing the leasing program would safeguard the value of our public lands for generations to come.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The plan is part of the highly controversial Gasco Natural Gas Development Project, which the Bureau of Land Management approved in 2012. That decision initially approved nearly 1,300 new oil and gas wells in Utah’s greater Desolation Canyon region. This 16-well project was one of the first site-specific authorizations to follow.