History

The Wilderness Society has been at the forefront of nearly every major public lands victory since 1935.

We have led the effort to protect permanently nearly 110 million acres of wilderness in 44 states.  From the revolutionary 1964 Wilderness Act to the landmark 2009 bill that protected more than two million acres of wilderness across the country, The Wilderness Society has helped preserve public wild lands, including:

  • Rich hardwood forests in the East
  • Stunning deserts in the Southwest
  • Snowcapped peaks in the Rockies
  • Old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest
  • Tundra in Alaska

The Wilderness Society remains true to our founders’ principles and dedicated to the concept that careful, credible science, bold advocacy and unswerving vision are essential underpinnings of wilderness conservation policy.

Wilderness Timeline

Since its founding in 1935, The Wilderness Society has helped to form the cornerstone of the movement to save America’s vanishing wilderness. 

Wilderness Act

The Wilderness Society was instrumental in passing the Wilderness Act of 1964. The act defines wilderness and provides for its legislative protection in the National Wilderness Preservation System.

Famous Quotes

The words of our founders and other conservation pioneers, as well as modern day activists and wilderness lovers, capture the ongoing struggle to protect our public wild lands.
 

  • Michael Reinemer

    The following statement is from Sally Miller, senior regional conservation representative with The Wilderness Society, regarding Representative Paul Cook’s introduction of legislation to create the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area and include it in the Bureau of Land Management’s system of National Conservation Lands:

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senators Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced the bill along with Republican Senators James Risch of Idaho, Cory Gardner of Colorado and Steve Daines of Montana as well as Democratic Senators Michael Bennet of Colorado, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Maria Cantwell of Washington.

    The bill would change how the federal government budgets for the suppression of wildfire disasters, to make it similar to the way other disasters are funded.

  • Anonymous

    “The amendment offered by Senator Fischer to the Keystone XL Pipeline legislation proposes to create major roadblocks for popular local programs like the Land and Water Conservation Fund that secures access to popular public lands for sportsmen, recreationists and all Americans.