Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the U.S., but its forests, mountains, deserts and rivers are at risk due to mining, irresponsible off-road vehicle use, climate change and other threats.

We are working to protect the most pristine wildlands in Idaho, from the majestic rivers of the Clearwater Basin to the rich interconnected wildlife habitat of the High Divide. That work includes restoring and connecting large landscapes and fending off development in sensitive areas as well as irresponsible off-road vehicle use.

Areas of focus:

Idaho’s High Divide

Idaho’s High Divide connects the ecosystems of Central Idaho and Greater Yellowstone, offering wildlife a safe corridor to travel between the two areas. This connection also provides a buffer from the effects of climate change, increased off-road vehicle use and fragmented land management.

Clearwater Basin

The Clearwater Basin encompasses millions of acres of forests, rivers and mountains just south of Idaho’s northern panhandle, providing habitat for fish and wildlife and world-class recreation.

Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands in southwest Idaho encompass one of the most remote and wild areas in the continental U.S. We are working to strengthen protections in effect in the area following wilderness designations in 2009.

Boulder-White Clouds

Designated as wilderness in 2015, Idaho’s Boulder-White Cloud is  a stunning mountain landscape supporting bighorn sheep, wolverines, pronghorn antelope, salmon and other wildlife.  We are working to ensure management of this area fully protects its wilderness values.

Help protect Idaho

We’re working to protect the most pristine of these wild Idaho lands, especially those that are the most important to wildlife and fish. The Wilderness Society needs your help in protecting these wild Idaho landscapes.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.