Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the U.S., but its forests, mountains, deserts and rivers are at risk due to mining, irresponsible off-road vehicle use, climate change and other threats.

We are working to protect the most pristine wildlands in Idaho, from the majestic rivers of the Clearwater Basin to the rich interconnected wildlife habitat of the High Divide. That work includes restoring and connecting large landscapes and fending off development in sensitive areas as well as irresponsible off-road vehicle use.

Areas of focus:

Idaho’s High Divide

Idaho’s High Divide connects the ecosystems of Central Idaho and Greater Yellowstone, offering wildlife a safe corridor to travel between the two areas. This connection also provides a buffer from the effects of climate change, increased off-road vehicle use and fragmented land management.

Clearwater Basin

The Clearwater Basin encompasses millions of acres of forests, rivers and mountains just south of Idaho’s northern panhandle, providing habitat for fish and wildlife and world-class recreation.

Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands in southwest Idaho encompass one of the most remote and wild areas in the continental U.S. We are working to strengthen protections in effect in the area following wilderness designations in 2009.

Boulder-White Clouds

Designated as wilderness in 2015, Idaho’s Boulder-White Cloud is  a stunning mountain landscape supporting bighorn sheep, wolverines, pronghorn antelope, salmon and other wildlife.  We are working to ensure management of this area fully protects its wilderness values.

Help protect Idaho

We’re working to protect the most pristine of these wild Idaho lands, especially those that are the most important to wildlife and fish. The Wilderness Society needs your help in protecting these wild Idaho landscapes.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Rather than using taxpayer dollars, the program’s funds come from a small slice of royalties from oil and gas leases in publicly owned offshore waters. 

    The 2017 budget would invest $900 million for conservation and recreation projects, which is the annual amount authorized by the 1964 bill that created this popular program. However, actual funding approved by Congress has traditionally fallen far short of that amount. 

    Alan Rowsome at The Wilderness Society commented:

  • Anonymous

    “The proposed guidelines from the Bureau of Land Management governing natural gas waste are a huge step forward toward ensuring public resources on federal lands are used for Americans’ benefit, and not wasted.

    “For too long, oil and gas companies have been able to vent and flare unlimited quantities of natural gas and ignore massive leaks from outdated infrastructure. These unregulated actions have immense consequences for American taxpayers, who lose out on more than $330 million annually from gas that is not being sold.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The 2016 Utah Public Lands Initiative (PLI) draft released by Utah Representative Rob Bishop fails to provide adequate protections for scenic public lands in the state, would undermine bedrock environmental laws and threatens to despoil key public lands.