Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the U.S., but its forests, mountains, deserts and rivers are at risk due to mining, irresponsible off-road vehicle use, climate change and other threats.

We are working to protect the most pristine wildlands in Idaho, from the majestic rivers of the Clearwater Basin to the rich interconnected wildlife habitat of the High Divide. That work includes restoring and connecting large landscapes and fending off development in sensitive areas as well as irresponsible off-road vehicle use.

Areas of focus:

Idaho’s High Divide

Idaho’s High Divide connects the ecosystems of Central Idaho and Greater Yellowstone, offering wildlife a safe corridor to travel between the two areas. This connection also provides a buffer from the effects of climate change, increased off-road vehicle use and fragmented land management.

Clearwater Basin

The Clearwater Basin encompasses millions of acres of forests, rivers and mountains just south of Idaho’s northern panhandle, providing habitat for fish and wildlife and world-class recreation.

Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands in southwest Idaho encompass one of the most remote and wild areas in the continental U.S. We are working to strengthen protections in effect in the area following wilderness designations in 2009.

Boulder-White Clouds

Designated as wilderness in 2015, Idaho’s Boulder-White Cloud is  a stunning mountain landscape supporting bighorn sheep, wolverines, pronghorn antelope, salmon and other wildlife.  We are working to ensure management of this area fully protects its wilderness values.

Help protect Idaho

We’re working to protect the most pristine of these wild Idaho lands, especially those that are the most important to wildlife and fish. The Wilderness Society needs your help in protecting these wild Idaho landscapes.

 

  • Anastasia Greene

    On Monday, September 26, the Colorado Bureau of Land Management state office announced that it will be pursuing a master leasing plan in Southwest Colorado. The statement comes after the agency engaged in an unprecedented public outreach campaign that consisted of a series of public meetings and the formation of a public working group that resulted in the submission of hundreds of comments to the local Tres Rios field office.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today the House of Representatives approved H.R. 845, the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act by Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Tim Walz (D-MN). The legislation would keep more trails across the nation open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteer and partner organizations and providing increased focus on a handful of priority areas around the country.

  • Michael Reinemer

    With very few legislative days left in the 114th Congress, this bill has no chance of being adopted and would do too little to protect wild, cultural and historic lands, including the critically important Bears Ears area.