Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the U.S., but its forests, mountains, deserts and rivers are at risk due to mining, irresponsible off-road vehicle use, climate change and other threats.

We are working to protect the most pristine wildlands in Idaho, from the majestic rivers of the Clearwater Basin to the rich interconnected wildlife habitat of the High Divide. That work includes restoring and connecting large landscapes and fending off development in sensitive areas as well as irresponsible off-road vehicle use.

Areas of focus:

Idaho’s High Divide

Idaho’s High Divide connects the ecosystems of Central Idaho and Greater Yellowstone, offering wildlife a safe corridor to travel between the two areas. This connection also provides a buffer from the effects of climate change, increased off-road vehicle use and fragmented land management.

Clearwater Basin

The Clearwater Basin encompasses millions of acres of forests, rivers and mountains just south of Idaho’s northern panhandle, providing habitat for fish and wildlife and world-class recreation.

Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands in southwest Idaho encompass one of the most remote and wild areas in the continental U.S. We are working to strengthen protections in effect in the area following wilderness designations in 2009.

Boulder-White Clouds

Designated as wilderness in 2015, Idaho’s Boulder-White Cloud is  a stunning mountain landscape supporting bighorn sheep, wolverines, pronghorn antelope, salmon and other wildlife.  We are working to ensure management of this area fully protects its wilderness values.

Help protect Idaho

We’re working to protect the most pristine of these wild Idaho lands, especially those that are the most important to wildlife and fish. The Wilderness Society needs your help in protecting these wild Idaho landscapes.

 

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.
  • Chart of offshore oil well blowout incident rates illustrates the need for stronger federal regulations to improve human safety and decrease environmental risk.

  • This fourth in a series of Easy to Start, Impossible to Finish reports analyzes four major transportation and energy projects in the planning stages in the state of Alaska. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker stopped discretionary spending on these four projects–the proposed Ambler Road in the Arctic Interior, Juneau Access, the Knik Arm Bridge and the Susitna-Watana Dam–soon after he took office in 2014. During 2015, Gov. Walker reversed course and allowed these projects to continue spending money on studies.