Magnificent Seven

These seven wild places — the Magnificent Seven — are among the most incredible and most endangered wildlands in America.

The Magnificent Seven wildlands are located within these iconic American landscapes, which The Wilderness Society works to protect:

The Magnificent Seven are among the most rugged, historical and cherished wild places in the world. Yet, they are threatened by oil and gas development, anti-wilderness legislation and other attacks.

Teshekpuk Lake

Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska's Western Arctic Reserve is a crucial habitat for caribou, many different birds and Alaska native communities.

Threat: Oil and gas

Desolation Canyon

Desolation Canyon’s red rock cliffs, rock spires and juniper-dotted slopes make it one of the more special rafting trips in the American west.

Threat: Oil and gas

Yakima Basin

The Yakima Basin is home to the largest tributary of the Columbia River, which sustains fish, families and farms. Salmon numbers are dwindling and the water levels are decreasing, which threatens the species and farms that depend on it.

Threat: Decreasing water levels and Salmon population

The Mahoosucs

With deep forests, splashing waterfalls and easy access to the Appalachian Trail in New England, the Mahoosucs are an outdoor wonderland. However, logging and development threaten this gorgeous forest.

Threat: Logging and development

Rocky Mountain Front

The Rocky Mountain Front contains the top one percent of wildlife habitat remaining in the lower 48 states with unmatched native plant and animal diversity. However, legislation from the House of Representatives threatens this amazing place.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

Dinkey Area

California's Dinkey area is known for its scenery and recreation. However fire suppression and climate changes have made it susceptible to a devastating fire that would wreak havoc on the area and surrounding communities. The Wilderness Society is working on making sure that the Dinkey area becomes a healthier forest with less chance of a catastrophic fire.

Threat: Catastrophic fire and climate change

Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National Forest in the Greater Smoky Mountains is one of the oldest national forests in the United States. It has tremendous recreational opportunities, such as hiking and swimming. However, a bill in the House of Representatives would open it up to corporate polluters and irresponsible developers.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

  • Michael Reinemer

    Strayed will receive the We Are the Wild Inspiration Award, which recognizes a person who embodies the spirit of wilderness and its transformative power.

    Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society, said, “In this 50th anniversary year of the Wilderness Act, we present this award to underscore the importance of inspiring people to discover and care for our wild lands. Today we honor Cheryl Strayed for her remarkable story and for inspiring new generations to experience wilderness, which forms the backbone of the American spirit.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    President Obama will use his executive authority to create the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument, an action that will improve outdoor recreation, safeguard vital water supplies and protect wildlife in the backyard of Los Angeles – the nation’s most populous county.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society applauds the Obama Administration for advancing bipartisan efforts to further protect ocean ecosystems and their scientific value by using the Antiquities Act to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, an undisturbed island and atoll chain located 1,000 miles southwest of Hawaii. The proclamation builds on the approximately 83,000 square-mile national monument initially designated by President George W. Bush in 2009.