Magnificent Seven

These seven wild places — the Magnificent Seven — are among the most incredible and most endangered wildlands in America.

The Magnificent Seven wildlands are located within these iconic American landscapes, which The Wilderness Society works to protect:

The Magnificent Seven are among the most rugged, historical and cherished wild places in the world. Yet, they are threatened by oil and gas development, anti-wilderness legislation and other attacks.

Teshekpuk Lake

Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska's Western Arctic Reserve is a crucial habitat for caribou, many different birds and Alaska native communities.

Threat: Oil and gas

Desolation Canyon

Desolation Canyon’s red rock cliffs, rock spires and juniper-dotted slopes make it one of the more special rafting trips in the American west.

Threat: Oil and gas

Yakima Basin

The Yakima Basin is home to the largest tributary of the Columbia River, which sustains fish, families and farms. Salmon numbers are dwindling and the water levels are decreasing, which threatens the species and farms that depend on it.

Threat: Decreasing water levels and Salmon population

The Mahoosucs

With deep forests, splashing waterfalls and easy access to the Appalachian Trail in New England, the Mahoosucs are an outdoor wonderland. However, logging and development threaten this gorgeous forest.

Threat: Logging and development

Rocky Mountain Front

The Rocky Mountain Front contains the top one percent of wildlife habitat remaining in the lower 48 states with unmatched native plant and animal diversity. However, legislation from the House of Representatives threatens this amazing place.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

Dinkey Area

California's Dinkey area is known for its scenery and recreation. However fire suppression and climate changes have made it susceptible to a devastating fire that would wreak havoc on the area and surrounding communities. The Wilderness Society is working on making sure that the Dinkey area becomes a healthier forest with less chance of a catastrophic fire.

Threat: Catastrophic fire and climate change

Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National Forest in the Greater Smoky Mountains is one of the oldest national forests in the United States. It has tremendous recreational opportunities, such as hiking and swimming. However, a bill in the House of Representatives would open it up to corporate polluters and irresponsible developers.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.