Magnificent Seven

These seven wild places — the Magnificent Seven — are among the most incredible and most endangered wildlands in America.

The Magnificent Seven wildlands are located within these iconic American landscapes, which The Wilderness Society works to protect:

The Magnificent Seven are among the most rugged, historical and cherished wild places in the world. Yet, they are threatened by oil and gas development, anti-wilderness legislation and other attacks.

Teshekpuk Lake

Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska's Western Arctic Reserve is a crucial habitat for caribou, many different birds and Alaska native communities.

Threat: Oil and gas

Desolation Canyon

Desolation Canyon’s red rock cliffs, rock spires and juniper-dotted slopes make it one of the more special rafting trips in the American west.

Threat: Oil and gas

Yakima Basin

The Yakima Basin is home to the largest tributary of the Columbia River, which sustains fish, families and farms. Salmon numbers are dwindling and the water levels are decreasing, which threatens the species and farms that depend on it.

Threat: Decreasing water levels and Salmon population

The Mahoosucs

With deep forests, splashing waterfalls and easy access to the Appalachian Trail in New England, the Mahoosucs are an outdoor wonderland. However, logging and development threaten this gorgeous forest.

Threat: Logging and development

Rocky Mountain Front

The Rocky Mountain Front contains the top one percent of wildlife habitat remaining in the lower 48 states with unmatched native plant and animal diversity. However, legislation from the House of Representatives threatens this amazing place.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

Dinkey Area

California's Dinkey area is known for its scenery and recreation. However fire suppression and climate changes have made it susceptible to a devastating fire that would wreak havoc on the area and surrounding communities. The Wilderness Society is working on making sure that the Dinkey area becomes a healthier forest with less chance of a catastrophic fire.

Threat: Catastrophic fire and climate change

Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National Forest in the Greater Smoky Mountains is one of the oldest national forests in the United States. It has tremendous recreational opportunities, such as hiking and swimming. However, a bill in the House of Representatives would open it up to corporate polluters and irresponsible developers.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

  • Michael Reinemer

    Rather than using taxpayer dollars, the program’s funds come from a small slice of royalties from oil and gas leases in publicly owned offshore waters. 

    The 2017 budget would invest $900 million for conservation and recreation projects, which is the annual amount authorized by the 1964 bill that created this popular program. However, actual funding approved by Congress has traditionally fallen far short of that amount. 

    Alan Rowsome at The Wilderness Society commented:

  • Anonymous

    “The proposed guidelines from the Bureau of Land Management governing natural gas waste are a huge step forward toward ensuring public resources on federal lands are used for Americans’ benefit, and not wasted.

    “For too long, oil and gas companies have been able to vent and flare unlimited quantities of natural gas and ignore massive leaks from outdated infrastructure. These unregulated actions have immense consequences for American taxpayers, who lose out on more than $330 million annually from gas that is not being sold.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The 2016 Utah Public Lands Initiative (PLI) draft released by Utah Representative Rob Bishop fails to provide adequate protections for scenic public lands in the state, would undermine bedrock environmental laws and threatens to despoil key public lands.