Magnificent Seven

These seven wild places — the Magnificent Seven — are among the most incredible and most endangered wildlands in America.

The Magnificent Seven wildlands are located within these iconic American landscapes, which The Wilderness Society works to protect:

The Magnificent Seven are among the most rugged, historical and cherished wild places in the world. Yet, they are threatened by oil and gas development, anti-wilderness legislation and other attacks.

Teshekpuk Lake

Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska's Western Arctic Reserve is a crucial habitat for caribou, many different birds and Alaska native communities.

Threat: Oil and gas

Desolation Canyon

Desolation Canyon’s red rock cliffs, rock spires and juniper-dotted slopes make it one of the more special rafting trips in the American west.

Threat: Oil and gas

Yakima Basin

The Yakima Basin is home to the largest tributary of the Columbia River, which sustains fish, families and farms. Salmon numbers are dwindling and the water levels are decreasing, which threatens the species and farms that depend on it.

Threat: Decreasing water levels and Salmon population

The Mahoosucs

With deep forests, splashing waterfalls and easy access to the Appalachian Trail in New England, the Mahoosucs are an outdoor wonderland. However, logging and development threaten this gorgeous forest.

Threat: Logging and development

Rocky Mountain Front

The Rocky Mountain Front contains the top one percent of wildlife habitat remaining in the lower 48 states with unmatched native plant and animal diversity. However, legislation from the House of Representatives threatens this amazing place.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

Dinkey Area

California's Dinkey area is known for its scenery and recreation. However fire suppression and climate changes have made it susceptible to a devastating fire that would wreak havoc on the area and surrounding communities. The Wilderness Society is working on making sure that the Dinkey area becomes a healthier forest with less chance of a catastrophic fire.

Threat: Catastrophic fire and climate change

Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National Forest in the Greater Smoky Mountains is one of the oldest national forests in the United States. It has tremendous recreational opportunities, such as hiking and swimming. However, a bill in the House of Representatives would open it up to corporate polluters and irresponsible developers.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society strongly supports bipartisan legislation, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 (S. 235, H.R. 167), to fix a budgetary problem called “fire borrowing.”  This is a destructive cycle in which the Forest Service is forced to take funds from other forest programs when its allotted wildfire funds are used up, essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul to put out fires in our national forests.