Magnificent Seven

These seven wild places — the Magnificent Seven — are among the most incredible and most endangered wildlands in America.

The Magnificent Seven wildlands are located within these iconic American landscapes, which The Wilderness Society works to protect:

The Magnificent Seven are among the most rugged, historical and cherished wild places in the world. Yet, they are threatened by oil and gas development, anti-wilderness legislation and other attacks.

Teshekpuk Lake

Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska's Western Arctic Reserve is a crucial habitat for caribou, many different birds and Alaska native communities.

Threat: Oil and gas

Desolation Canyon

Desolation Canyon’s red rock cliffs, rock spires and juniper-dotted slopes make it one of the more special rafting trips in the American west.

Threat: Oil and gas

Yakima Basin

The Yakima Basin is home to the largest tributary of the Columbia River, which sustains fish, families and farms. Salmon numbers are dwindling and the water levels are decreasing, which threatens the species and farms that depend on it.

Threat: Decreasing water levels and Salmon population

The Mahoosucs

With deep forests, splashing waterfalls and easy access to the Appalachian Trail in New England, the Mahoosucs are an outdoor wonderland. However, logging and development threaten this gorgeous forest.

Threat: Logging and development

Rocky Mountain Front

The Rocky Mountain Front contains the top one percent of wildlife habitat remaining in the lower 48 states with unmatched native plant and animal diversity. However, legislation from the House of Representatives threatens this amazing place.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

Dinkey Area

California's Dinkey area is known for its scenery and recreation. However fire suppression and climate changes have made it susceptible to a devastating fire that would wreak havoc on the area and surrounding communities. The Wilderness Society is working on making sure that the Dinkey area becomes a healthier forest with less chance of a catastrophic fire.

Threat: Catastrophic fire and climate change

Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National Forest in the Greater Smoky Mountains is one of the oldest national forests in the United States. It has tremendous recreational opportunities, such as hiking and swimming. However, a bill in the House of Representatives would open it up to corporate polluters and irresponsible developers.

Threat: Anti-wilderness legislation

  • Neil Shader

    New legislation introduced today in the House and the Senate would undermine state and federal planning efforts, nearly complete, to conserve the greater sage grouse and perpetuate uncertainty faced by all westerners, according to The Wilderness Society. The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relations director for The Wilderness Society.

  • Neil Shader

    Authorization for LWCF runs out on September 30 2015.

    Today, Earth Day, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on “reauthorization and potential reforms” to LWCF. Funded primarily by offshore oil royalties—not taxpayer dollars—the program has had strong bipartisan support since its enactment in 1964. The Wilderness Society strongly supports several bills to reauthorize LWCF including S. 890, S. 338 and H.R. 1814, now pending in Congress.

  • Neil Shader

    Proactive, cooperative conservation measures could be a model for protections across the West

    The following statement can be attributed to Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy and planning for The Wilderness Society, regarding the Department of Interior’s decision to not add the bi-state greater sage grouse population to the Endangered Species List.