New Mexico Focus Areas

At Wilderness, we're working to safeguard New Mexico’s unique lands, from the snowy peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to wind-tossed grasses of Otero Mesa.

We are working to protect several important New Mexico wildlands from mineral exploitation, oil and gas development, abusive off-road vehicle use and climate change.

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks

Close in proximity to Las Cruces, a growing metropolitan area, the diverse and scenic Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks area is one of incredible botanical diversity.

Rio Grande del Norte

Rio Grande del Norte is a stunning New Mexico wildland with scenic vistas, natural landmarks and waters that sustain animals and surrounding communities.

Otero Mesa

Otero Mesa is a sweeping 1.2 million acre plain — the last fragment of the wild Chihuahan Desert. Potential mining operations threaten Otero Mesa and the wildlife that lives there.

Columbine Hondo

Columbine Hondo in northern New Mexico's Sangre de Cristo Mountains is a wildlife habitat, a recreation haven and a source of clean drinking water.

Petaca Pinta

Petaca Pinta area is a rich and beautiful wilderness area within New Mexico's red-rock country, featuring prairie grasses waving through the remnants of ancient civilization.

  • Comments from The Wilderness Society, Natural Resources Defense Council, and others submitted to the Bureau of Land Management regarding proposed rules for leasing land for wind and solar energy projects on federal lands. 

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • The Wilderness Society submitted official comments on the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation plan that was proposed early in the fall of 2014. The comment period allowed for broad public participation in determining the future of balancing conservation and recreation with renewable energy development.

    The following is an excerpt from our comments submitted on February 22, 2015. The full comment document is available for download.