New Mexico

New Mexico boasts some of the nation’s most unique wildlands and natural landmarks — from the snowy peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the wind-tossed grasses of Otero Mesa.

New Mexico has some of the wildest public lands left in the west. Yet, it also has less federally designated wilderness than any western state.

New Mexico’s wildlands reflect a living history of the state. Visitors to New Mexico wilderness encounter many natural landmarks, including:

  • Remnants of cindercones from New Mexico’s volcanic past
  • Fossils left from receding oceans
  • Petroglyphs indigenous peoples carved in the rocks

At Wilderness, we are working to protect New Mexico’s wildlands and natural landmarks from threats like:

  • Mineral exploitation
  • Oil and gas development
  • Abusive off-road vehicle use
  • Climate change

Stories from New Mexico

See New Mexico’s wildlands through the eyes of its residents and get a first-hand look at this wild and beautiful state.

Focus areas

Learn about important wildlands in New Mexico that deserve the highest level of wilderness protection.

Other campaigns

Learn about campaigns to protect New Mexico’s natural landmarks, places like the Valles Caldera.

Help protect wilderness in New Mexico

You can help ensure that New Mexico’s wildlands and natural landmarks remain wild. 

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.