North Cascades

To the East of Washington's Puget Sound, you'll find a remarkable mountain range full of crags and jagged peaks, alpine lakes and streaming cascades.

This is the North Cascades, a mountainous land with more than 2.5 million acres of pristine wilderness stretching from the Canadian border to the foothills of Mt. Rainier. Visitors to the region find world-class recreation and pristine wilderness areas that help to clean our air and drinking water.

Why the North Cascades

Learn more about this stunning landscape and why it’s worth protecting.

Stories from the North Cascades

While the natural landscape of Washington state has set the scene for many fictional stories, there are just as many real-life stories connected with the beautiful North Cascades.

Experience the North Cascades

The North Cascades boast some of the best wildlands recreation in the Pacific Northwest — if not the world. They offer a multitude of fun ways to get out and explore the region’s natural beauty.

Focus areas

The North Cascades span eight counties. The area sustains rural and urban communities east and west of the Cascade Crest. We’re working to protect several areas within this important landscape.

Help protect the North Cascades

There are many ways you can help ensure the North Cascades remain vibrant for generations to come.Make a donation to help protect the North Cascades.

 

Click here to see a map of North Cascades Wilderness Areas

 

  • After years of sharing photos that show the best of American lands, the BLM now apparently sees these places in terms of the polluting resources that can be drilled, dug or blasted from beneath their surface.

  • Trump aims attack at national monuments: 24 at risk

    President Trump is ordering a "review" of at least 24 national monuments designated since the beginning of 1996, a sweeping action that is intended to shrink boundaries and reduce protections. Here are some of the monuments under attack, ranging from rare wildlife habitat to Native American archaeological ruins.

  • Amid a new flurry of executive orders, Trump directed Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to examine more than 20 national monuments designated since the beginning of 1996, presumably with an eye toward shrinking their boundaries and reducing protection.