North Cascades

To the East of Washington's Puget Sound, you'll find a remarkable mountain range full of crags and jagged peaks, alpine lakes and streaming cascades.

This is the North Cascades, a mountainous land with more than 2.5 million acres of pristine wilderness stretching from the Canadian border to the foothills of Mt. Rainier. Visitors to the region find world-class recreation and pristine wilderness areas that help to clean our air and drinking water.

Why the North Cascades

Learn more about this stunning landscape and why it’s worth protecting.

Stories from the North Cascades

While the natural landscape of Washington state has set the scene for many fictional stories, there are just as many real-life stories connected with the beautiful North Cascades.

Experience the North Cascades

The North Cascades boast some of the best wildlands recreation in the Pacific Northwest — if not the world. They offer a multitude of fun ways to get out and explore the region’s natural beauty.

Focus areas

The North Cascades span eight counties. The area sustains rural and urban communities east and west of the Cascade Crest. We’re working to protect several areas within this important landscape.

Help protect the North Cascades

There are many ways you can help ensure the North Cascades remain vibrant for generations to come.

Make a donation to help protect the North Cascades.

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.