North Cascades

To the East of Washington's Puget Sound, you'll find a remarkable mountain range full of crags and jagged peaks, alpine lakes and streaming cascades.

This is the North Cascades, a mountainous land with more than 2.5 million acres of pristine wilderness stretching from the Canadian border to the foothills of Mt. Rainier. Visitors to the region find world-class recreation and pristine wilderness areas that help to clean our air and drinking water.

Why the North Cascades

Learn more about this stunning landscape and why it’s worth protecting.

Stories from the North Cascades

While the natural landscape of Washington state has set the scene for many fictional stories, there are just as many real-life stories connected with the beautiful North Cascades.

Experience the North Cascades

The North Cascades boast some of the best wildlands recreation in the Pacific Northwest — if not the world. They offer a multitude of fun ways to get out and explore the region’s natural beauty.

Focus areas

The North Cascades span eight counties. The area sustains rural and urban communities east and west of the Cascade Crest. We’re working to protect several areas within this important landscape.

Help protect the North Cascades

There are many ways you can help ensure the North Cascades remain vibrant for generations to come.Make a donation to help protect the North Cascades.

 

Click here to see a map of North Cascades Wilderness Areas

 

  • Neil Shader

    New legislation introduced today in the House and the Senate would undermine state and federal planning efforts, nearly complete, to conserve the greater sage grouse and perpetuate uncertainty faced by all westerners, according to The Wilderness Society. The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relations director for The Wilderness Society.

  • Neil Shader

    Authorization for LWCF runs out on September 30 2015.

    Today, Earth Day, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on “reauthorization and potential reforms” to LWCF. Funded primarily by offshore oil royalties—not taxpayer dollars—the program has had strong bipartisan support since its enactment in 1964. The Wilderness Society strongly supports several bills to reauthorize LWCF including S. 890, S. 338 and H.R. 1814, now pending in Congress.

  • Neil Shader

    Proactive, cooperative conservation measures could be a model for protections across the West

    The following statement can be attributed to Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy and planning for The Wilderness Society, regarding the Department of Interior’s decision to not add the bi-state greater sage grouse population to the Endangered Species List.