North Cascades

To the East of Washington's Puget Sound, you'll find a remarkable mountain range full of crags and jagged peaks, alpine lakes and streaming cascades.

This is the North Cascades, a mountainous land with more than 2.5 million acres of pristine wilderness stretching from the Canadian border to the foothills of Mt. Rainier. Visitors to the region find world-class recreation and pristine wilderness areas that help to clean our air and drinking water.

Why the North Cascades

Learn more about this stunning landscape and why it’s worth protecting.

Stories from the North Cascades

While the natural landscape of Washington state has set the scene for many fictional stories, there are just as many real-life stories connected with the beautiful North Cascades.

Experience the North Cascades

The North Cascades boast some of the best wildlands recreation in the Pacific Northwest — if not the world. They offer a multitude of fun ways to get out and explore the region’s natural beauty.

Focus areas

The North Cascades span eight counties. The area sustains rural and urban communities east and west of the Cascade Crest. We’re working to protect several areas within this important landscape.

Help protect the North Cascades

There are many ways you can help ensure the North Cascades remain vibrant for generations to come.Make a donation to help protect the North Cascades.

 

Click here to see a map of North Cascades Wilderness Areas

 

  • The 115th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.