Northern Forest focus areas

The Northern Forest is home to pristine hardwood forests, rivers and mountains that provide clean water and recreation opportunities to local communities.

We're working in the Northern Forest to restore connected landscapes, build support for conservation and increase protected wild areas.

Nulhegan Basin

The low mountains and bogs of the Nulhegan Basin are where two classic forests meet: the Canadian boreal and the New England hardwood.

Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge

The Umbagog area is bursting with wildlife, including a dense moose population. It's a wildland of lakes, bogs and wetlands that needs more protection.

High Peaks of Western Maine

This diverse landscape has some of tallest mountains and the most diverse wildlife in the state. But only 15 percent of Western Maine’s forests are protected from development.

The Mahoosucs

Rapid development threatens this outdoor adventure paradise. It's an important wildlife habitat and economic driver for the local economy.

White Mountain National Forest

Despite being one of our most popular national forests, the White Mountains are in danger from logging and roads.

  • Max Greenberg

    The Wilderness Society is pleased to join California desert residents, local elected officials, tribal representatives and community leaders dedicating the newly designated Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow and Castle Mountains National Monuments. United States Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell; California Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird; Congressman Raul Ruiz (CA-36); Jody Noiron, Forest Supervisor, San Bernardino National Forest, U.S.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    During its history, the state of Idaho has sold off more than 1.7 million acres of land to private interests, according to an analysis of land sale data by The Wilderness Society released this week.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.