Northern Forest Projects

Protecting wilderness lands and wildlife habitat is a priority in New England’s Northern Forest.

As the consequences of climate change grow clearer, we support energy conservation and responsible renewable energy development that reduces harmful greenhouse gas emissions while also preserving core areas that help nature adapt to climate stresses..

The Northern Forest region of the U.S. contains the largest expanse of intact hardwood forest left in the east, plus tracts of spruce and fir that may become rarer as the climate warms. It is important to balance clean energy development in this rich area with activities to protect the wildest parts of this 26-million-acre forested landscape.

Northern Forest Wind Projects

Deerfield Wind is the first wind energy facility permitted in a national forest, so it is important to get it right. This project is in an area formerly proposed for designation as protected wilderness, called Lamb Brook. To the north, Seneca Mountain Wind is proposed for a ridgeline bordering Vermont’s largest network of protected lands.  Both areas are important habitat for many animals, including bears and bats.

Northern Pass

Northern Pass is a proposed transmission line that would bring Canadian hydropower into New England. The project would cut across lands in New Hampshire that have already been conserved, including the White Mountain National Forest, as well as encroach on remote lands that ecologists have prioritized for future protection.

See also:

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.