Northern Forest Projects

Protecting wilderness lands and wildlife habitat is a priority in New England’s Northern Forest.

As the consequences of climate change grow clearer, we support energy conservation and responsible renewable energy development that reduces harmful greenhouse gas emissions while also preserving core areas that help nature adapt to climate stresses..

The Northern Forest region of the U.S. contains the largest expanse of intact hardwood forest left in the east, plus tracts of spruce and fir that may become rarer as the climate warms. It is important to balance clean energy development in this rich area with activities to protect the wildest parts of this 26-million-acre forested landscape.

Northern Forest Wind Projects

Deerfield Wind is the first wind energy facility permitted in a national forest, so it is important to get it right. This project is in an area formerly proposed for designation as protected wilderness, called Lamb Brook. To the north, Seneca Mountain Wind is proposed for a ridgeline bordering Vermont’s largest network of protected lands.  Both areas are important habitat for many animals, including bears and bats.

Northern Pass

Northern Pass is a proposed transmission line that would bring Canadian hydropower into New England. The project would cut across lands in New Hampshire that have already been conserved, including the White Mountain National Forest, as well as encroach on remote lands that ecologists have prioritized for future protection.

See also:

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society strongly supports bipartisan legislation, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 (S. 235, H.R. 167), to fix a budgetary problem called “fire borrowing.”  This is a destructive cycle in which the Forest Service is forced to take funds from other forest programs when its allotted wildfire funds are used up, essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul to put out fires in our national forests.