Northern Forest Projects

Protecting wilderness lands and wildlife habitat is a priority in New England’s Northern Forest.

As the consequences of climate change grow clearer, we support energy conservation and responsible renewable energy development that reduces harmful greenhouse gas emissions while also preserving core areas that help nature adapt to climate stresses..

The Northern Forest region of the U.S. contains the largest expanse of intact hardwood forest left in the east, plus tracts of spruce and fir that may become rarer as the climate warms. It is important to balance clean energy development in this rich area with activities to protect the wildest parts of this 26-million-acre forested landscape.

Northern Forest Wind Projects

Deerfield Wind is the first wind energy facility permitted in a national forest, so it is important to get it right. This project is in an area formerly proposed for designation as protected wilderness, called Lamb Brook. To the north, Seneca Mountain Wind is proposed for a ridgeline bordering Vermont’s largest network of protected lands.  Both areas are important habitat for many animals, including bears and bats.

Northern Pass

Northern Pass is a proposed transmission line that would bring Canadian hydropower into New England. The project would cut across lands in New Hampshire that have already been conserved, including the White Mountain National Forest, as well as encroach on remote lands that ecologists have prioritized for future protection.

See also:

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.