Northern Forest Projects

Protecting wilderness lands and wildlife habitat is a priority in New England’s Northern Forest.

As the consequences of climate change grow clearer, we support energy conservation and responsible renewable energy development that reduces harmful greenhouse gas emissions while also preserving core areas that help nature adapt to climate stresses..

The Northern Forest region of the U.S. contains the largest expanse of intact hardwood forest left in the east, plus tracts of spruce and fir that may become rarer as the climate warms. It is important to balance clean energy development in this rich area with activities to protect the wildest parts of this 26-million-acre forested landscape.

Northern Forest Wind Projects

Deerfield Wind is the first wind energy facility permitted in a national forest, so it is important to get it right. This project is in an area formerly proposed for designation as protected wilderness, called Lamb Brook. To the north, Seneca Mountain Wind is proposed for a ridgeline bordering Vermont’s largest network of protected lands.  Both areas are important habitat for many animals, including bears and bats.

Northern Pass

Northern Pass is a proposed transmission line that would bring Canadian hydropower into New England. The project would cut across lands in New Hampshire that have already been conserved, including the White Mountain National Forest, as well as encroach on remote lands that ecologists have prioritized for future protection.

See also:

  • BLM Planning 2.0 hearing support documents

  • 2015 Audited Financial Statements

  • This report describes how the U.S. government agency that oversees 700 million subsurface acres of oil and gas resources on nearly 250 million acres of public lands is saddled with outdated and unbalanced policies, often contradicting its own mandate to manage the land for multiple uses.

    90 percent of the public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management is open to oil and gas leasing, even in areas with little or no potential for developing these resources, compromising potential for protecting wildlife and recreation, while encouraging speculative leasing.