Northern Forest Projects

Protecting wilderness lands and wildlife habitat is a priority in New England’s Northern Forest.

As the consequences of climate change grow clearer, we support energy conservation and responsible renewable energy development that reduces harmful greenhouse gas emissions while also preserving core areas that help nature adapt to climate stresses..

The Northern Forest region of the U.S. contains the largest expanse of intact hardwood forest left in the east, plus tracts of spruce and fir that may become rarer as the climate warms. It is important to balance clean energy development in this rich area with activities to protect the wildest parts of this 26-million-acre forested landscape.

Northern Forest Wind Projects

Deerfield Wind is the first wind energy facility permitted in a national forest, so it is important to get it right. This project is in an area formerly proposed for designation as protected wilderness, called Lamb Brook. To the north, Seneca Mountain Wind is proposed for a ridgeline bordering Vermont’s largest network of protected lands.  Both areas are important habitat for many animals, including bears and bats.

Northern Pass

Northern Pass is a proposed transmission line that would bring Canadian hydropower into New England. The project would cut across lands in New Hampshire that have already been conserved, including the White Mountain National Forest, as well as encroach on remote lands that ecologists have prioritized for future protection.

See also:

  • Sample Letter to IRA Adminstrator DOC

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.
  • Chart of offshore oil well blowout incident rates illustrates the need for stronger federal regulations to improve human safety and decrease environmental risk.