Northern Forest

The Northern Forest sprawls over the northeast United States, from the Adirondack Mountains in New York all the way up to the northern woods of Maine.

In the Northern Forest, you’ll find world-class recreation set amongst deep woods and bird-filled wetlands. But these lands are at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to protect the Northern Forest from threats like climate change and development.

Why the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is a land where sugar maples thrive, moose and lynx roam, spruce-fir forests teem with migratory songbirds and humans continue to enjoy age-old connections to the land. Generations of local communities have enjoyed the economic, recreational and health benefits the Northern Forest provides. At Wilderness, we're working to keep it that way.

Stories from the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is home to thousands of people that care about wild places, and millions more that visit each year.  Here are some of their stories.

Experience the Northern Forest

With forests crawling with deer, moose, black bear and other wildlife, the Northern Forest is a wildlife watcher’s dream come true. Throw in world class hiking, camping and fishing and you’ve got one of the most popular wild places in America.

Focus areas

The Northern Forest stretches from the tip of northern Maine to the Adirondacks in New York. Within the heart of the Northern Forest landscape we work to protect several sensitive wildlands.

Other campaigns

In addition to our focus areas, we also work to protect other areas of New England, as well as identify ways for our wild places to cope with climate change.

Help protect the Northern Forest

We work with numerous partners to build political and public awareness of the Northern Forest. Help us continue to protect this special area for future generations.

Make a donation to help protect the Northern Forest.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senator Cantwell, the ranking member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, has scheduled a hearing in Seattle on August 27 to examine wildfire issues.  Senator John Barrasso, who chairs that committee’s Public Lands, Forests and Mining subcommittee, is also scheduled to participate in the hearing.

  • Tim Woody

    When President Obama visits Alaska at the end of August, climate change will be a key focus of his trip. The Wilderness Society developed the following memo to provide a brief primer on key Alaska public lands where the effects of climate change can already be seen. This information is intended to ease your research and inform your reporting during the president’s visit. It focuses on four areas where the president’s administration has made major, important decisions:

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are heartened to see that President Obama is focusing on clean energy as part of building an enduring environmental legacy in the last 18 months of his presidency, and the Clean Power Plan is a good start,” said Jamie Williams, president of the Wilderness Society, one of the oldest conservation groups in the United States. "This administration has shifted the role our public lands play in powering the nation. We have solar projects on public lands for the first time ever.