Northern Forest

The Northern Forest sprawls over the northeast United States, from the Adirondack Mountains in New York all the way up to the northern woods of Maine.

In the Northern Forest, you’ll find world-class recreation set amongst deep woods and bird-filled wetlands. But these lands are at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to protect the Northern Forest from threats like climate change and development.

Why the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is a land where sugar maples thrive, moose and lynx roam, spruce-fir forests teem with migratory songbirds and humans continue to enjoy age-old connections to the land. Generations of local communities have enjoyed the economic, recreational and health benefits the Northern Forest provides. At Wilderness, we're working to keep it that way.

Stories from the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is home to thousands of people that care about wild places, and millions more that visit each year.  Here are some of their stories.

Experience the Northern Forest

With forests crawling with deer, moose, black bear and other wildlife, the Northern Forest is a wildlife watcher’s dream come true. Throw in world class hiking, camping and fishing and you’ve got one of the most popular wild places in America.

Focus areas

The Northern Forest stretches from the tip of northern Maine to the Adirondacks in New York. Within the heart of the Northern Forest landscape we work to protect several sensitive wildlands.

Other campaigns

In addition to our focus areas, we also work to protect other areas of New England, as well as identify ways for our wild places to cope with climate change.

Help protect the Northern Forest

We work with numerous partners to build political and public awareness of the Northern Forest. Help us continue to protect this special area for future generations.

Make a donation to help protect the Northern Forest.

  • Anastasia Greene

    “Secretary Jewell is on the right track. The plan to pursue cancellation of this oil and gas lease sets the stage for getting rid of the remaining leases in the Badger-Two Medicine region,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “This is not only an ecologically invaluable link between Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, it’s a sacred place for the Blackfeet Nation and a stronghold for the Blackfeet culture.

  • Michael Reinemer

    “In this season of Thanksgiving, we are grateful to have a bipartisan group of Senators at the grown-ups’ table showing real leadership by advancing legislation to permanently reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, in S. 556,” said Alan Rowsome, Senior Director of Government Relations for Lands at The Wilderness Society.  “That contrasts with Rep.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today federal legislation to protect and enhance the Yakima River basin’s fisheries, ecosystem and water supply was passed by the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.