Northern Forest

The Northern Forest sprawls over the northeast United States, from the Adirondack Mountains in New York all the way up to the northern woods of Maine.

In the Northern Forest, you’ll find world-class recreation set amongst deep woods and bird-filled wetlands. But these lands are at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to protect the Northern Forest from threats like climate change and development.

Why the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is a land where sugar maples thrive, moose and lynx roam, spruce-fir forests teem with migratory songbirds and humans continue to enjoy age-old connections to the land. Generations of local communities have enjoyed the economic, recreational and health benefits the Northern Forest provides. At Wilderness, we're working to keep it that way.

Stories from the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is home to thousands of people that care about wild places, and millions more that visit each year.  Here are some of their stories.

Experience the Northern Forest

With forests crawling with deer, moose, black bear and other wildlife, the Northern Forest is a wildlife watcher’s dream come true. Throw in world class hiking, camping and fishing and you’ve got one of the most popular wild places in America.

Focus areas

The Northern Forest stretches from the tip of northern Maine to the Adirondacks in New York. Within the heart of the Northern Forest landscape we work to protect several sensitive wildlands.

Other campaigns

In addition to our focus areas, we also work to protect other areas of New England, as well as identify ways for our wild places to cope with climate change.

Help protect the Northern Forest

We work with numerous partners to build political and public awareness of the Northern Forest. Help us continue to protect this special area for future generations.

Make a donation to help protect the Northern Forest.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society strongly supports bipartisan legislation, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 (S. 235, H.R. 167), to fix a budgetary problem called “fire borrowing.”  This is a destructive cycle in which the Forest Service is forced to take funds from other forest programs when its allotted wildfire funds are used up, essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul to put out fires in our national forests.